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Sunday, October 20
 

9:30am

Anchor Learning Network Registration
Sunday October 20, 2019 9:30am - 10:30am
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Anchor Learning Network Meeting (Invite Only)
Attendance to this event is by invitation only.

The CUMU-TDC Anchor Learning Network (ALN) is designed to facilitate a more rapid and effective advancement of the anchor mission within member institutions, in home communities, and across the higher education sector. By leveraging a peer learning framework, ALN members will systematically transform higher education to fully serve its public mission and advance the long-term social, economic, and physical health of our campuses and communities.

In February 2018, a call was issued to CUMU member institutions to participate in a pilot year called the Higher Education Anchor Mission Initiative. Thirty-three answered the call and, over the course of 2018, collaboratively worked to identify resources and develop new tools for implementing, expanding, and evaluating anchor mission practices within their institutions, higher education, and the communities they serve. The Anchor Learning Network builds on this momentum and over the next three years, ALN participants will have made significant progress to institutionalize the anchor mission on their campuses and will be leaders in transforming the national perception of higher education. Please note: The Group will be departing the Loew's Hotel between 10:30 and 11:00 am.

Sunday October 20, 2019 11:00am - 5:00pm
Drexel University

3:00pm

Registration
Sunday October 20, 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00pm

Welcome Meet and Greet
Arriving on Sunday? Join us for a meet and greet at The Hard Rock Café - 1113 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Sponsored by Collaboratory®


Sunday October 20, 2019 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
 
Monday, October 21
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Breakfast will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer.

Additional seating will be available in Commonwealth D.

Monday October 21, 2019 7:00am - 9:00am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

7:00am

Registration
Monday October 21, 2019 7:00am - 4:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Community Experience: Drexel University: The Dornsife Center: From Idea to National Model for Local Partnerships
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

The Dornsife Center: From Idea to National Model for Local Partnerships

Hosted by Drexel University

Now celebrating its 5th year, the Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships is the physical manifestation of President John Fry’s mission for Drexel University to be the most civically engage collegiate institution in the country. The center sits directly between the two neighborhoods closest to the university, Mantua and Powelton Village, and seeks to engage the University with community residents in creative collaboration to address matters of shared importance. A recently-purchased 50,000+ square-foot building, which has been a community anchor for the last 30+ years, will now be an extension of the Dornsife Center. Our team has engaged the local neighborhoods in a nine-month conversation to understand their vision for the space, and we are excited about the possibilities.

Participants will learn the history of how the Dornsife Center came to be and what the challenges have been along the way. We will reflect on the business model that allows the team to take community and university interest from ideas to engaging programs and events. With the Dornsife Center team, the Dornsife Community Advisory Council, engaged university faculty, and students, participants will discuss what an ambitious project looks like on the ground.

Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Community Experience: Rutgers University–Camden: Camden Rising: A Symbol of Promise
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

Camden Rising: A Symbol of Promise 
 
Hosted by Rutgers University–Camden


In 2015, President Barack Obama visited Camden and said, "I've come here to Camden to do something that might have been unthinkable just a few years ago and that is to hold you up as a symbol of promise to the nation."

Camden, NJ is a city in the midst of a resurgence, and Rutgers University–Camden is a prime partner in Camden Rising, a multifaceted approach to revitalizing the city and promoting its’ growth and progress. At its height, the city of Camden was a powerful economic driver, home to Campbell Soup, NY Shipyard and RCA/Victor, but like many former industrial cities, Camden has faced considerable challenges over the years with high crime, low-achieving schools, unemployment and economic disinvestment.

However, through a concerted effort several years ago, that strategically focused on simultaneously addressing public safety, education, and redevelopment through public-private partnerships, Camden is transforming. Crime is at an all-time low, high school graduation rates are at an all-time high, unemployment is dropping, “eds and meds” are expanding, and businesses and organizations like Subaru, American Water, and the Philadelphia 76ers have come to Camden, to be a part of the movement.

In this experience, you will travel the city of Camden and learn the role that Rutgers-Camden is playing in Camden Rising. You will see the redevelopment of the expanded eds and meds corridor, meet a broad range of stakeholders—from residents, community partners, and Rutgers faculty, staff and students—and hear about the range of civic engagement initiatives taking place across the city, and visit organizations focused on community and youth development, hunger and homelessness, health and wellness, housing and K12 education.

Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Community Experience: Temple University: Community/University Partnerships: Collective Impact on Workforce Development in North Philadelphia
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

Community/University Partnerships: Collective Impact on Workforce Development in North Philadelphia
 
Hosted by Temple University

This North Philadelphia community experience will take participants up Broad Street, which is the main north/south thoroughfare of the City. Starting at Temple University’s main campus, which is less than two miles from City Hall, participants will learn more about the North Philadelphia community, about the university’s comprehensive workforce development plans and programs, and about strategic partnerships with local stakeholders.

From Temple University, participants will travel less than a mile to the Sharswood Community, where Philadelphia Housing Authority recently relocated its main headquarters. Participants will tour Vaux Big Picture High School, which houses a HUD designated EnVision Center, and where the College of Public Health has co-located a community clinic operated by a nurse practitioner and supported by nursing students. Presenters will share information examples of how anchor institutions, such as Temple and PHA, are transforming neighborhoods for the benefit of local residents.

Next, participants will travel through neighborhoods a mile north, and closer to Temple University Hospital. Information about two programs will be highlighted: (1) Cure Violence Philadelphia that uses violence interrupters to stop community violence, and (2) Community Health Workers who are frontline public health workers and who are trusted members of the community.

Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Community Experience: University of Pennsylvania: Netter Center for Community Partnerships and the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

Netter Center for Community Partnerships and the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance

Hosted by University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania’s evolving, unified approach as an anchor institution involves the engagement of the full range of intellectual and institutional resources of the University in democratic, sustained partnership with its local community of West Philadelphia.

Since the mid-1980s, Penn, through its Netter Center for Community Partnerships, has developed Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) courses involving collaborative real-world problem-solving that is rooted in and connected to research, teaching, learning, practice, and service.

Penn and the Netter Center have enjoyed a particularly robust partnership with The Paul Robeson House and West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance (WPCA). A cornerstone of the collaboration is the relationships built between Penn students, faculty, and West Philadelphia community members through ABCS courses. In addition, in collaboration with the Netter Center’s University-Assisted Community Schools programming, Paul Robeson House and WPCA have partnered with Sayre, West Philadelphia High School, and Paul Robeson High School for Human Services, including hosting high school interns.

The site of the CUMU community tour, the Paul Robeson House and Museum, honors the legacy of Paul Leroy Robeson (1898–1976), an actor, orator, athlete, lawyer, singer, author, scholar, activist and linguist. The Robeson House is owned and operated by the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance. It has been named a historic landmark by the Pennsylvania Historical and Commission and is listed on the National Register for Historic Places.

The tour will include hearing from the executive director of the Paul Robeson House/WPCA, Vernoca L. Michael, who is also a member of the Netter Center’s Community Advisory Board; members of the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance; Penn faculty who teach ABCS courses; and staff of the Netter Center for Community Partnerships. The tour will also include a musical performance by the Robeson High School choir.

Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Workshop: Measuring Community Capacity and Hyperlocal Community Engagement
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

Measuring Community Capacity and Hyperlocal Community Engagement
Across the United States and Canada, CUMU member institutions are committed to place-based engagements (Yamamura & Koth, 2018) and value them as a powerful way to connect the resources of the campus to the communities they serve to foster mutually-beneficial impacts. A growing number of institutions are developing hyperlocal engagements (Dostilio, 2017)—instances in which community engagement efforts are focused on a bounded area within a larger city or metropolitan region, often supported by some form of built infrastructure such as a community engagement center. The communities hosting these higher education engagements have a wealth of assets that enable them to sustain people as they live, work, and play. Such assets might include social capital, collective efficacy, sense of community, and readiness for change, among others (Ohmer, Coulton, Freedman, Sobeck, & Booth, 2019). Recognizing a community’s innate assets and aligning engagements with them can position a campus to be a valued partner that is as interested in a community’s long-term capacity as it is achieving the campus engagement strategy. Documenting and assessing a community’s existing capacities may also inform strategies for impact evaluation.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN
  • Get a first look at the findings from a recent CUMU benchmarking survey about hyperlocal engagement and develop a landscape view of hyperlocal engagement across the US.
  • Learn about asset-based community development and the interlinkage with hyperlocal engagement.
  • Discuss a framework for community and neighborhood research and measurement at the individual, collective, community and societal levels.
  • Explore theoretical and conceptual models for examining the relationship between hyperlocal community engagement and community capacity and review reliable, valid measures that fit with these models.
  • Design an approach to assess the degree to which a particular capacity area is present and growing within a community to which your campus engagements are connected.

FACILITATORS
  • Lina Dostilio, EdD, Associate Vice Chancellor, Community Engagement, University of Pittsburgh, 2019 CUMU Research Fellow
  • Mary Ohmer, PhD, Associate Professor and Chair, Community, Organization and Social Action Specialization, School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh; Lead Author:  Ohmer, M.L., Coulton, C., Freedman, D., Sobeck, J. & Booth, J. (2019). Measures for Community and Neighborhood Research.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Speakers
avatar for Lina D. Dostilio

Lina D. Dostilio

Associate Vice Chancellor for Community Engagement, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Lina Dostilio is the Associate Vice Chancellor for Community Engagement at the University of Pittsburgh. She is responsible for supporting community-facing work that includes community relations, cultivating strategic opportunities to advance Pitt’s community engagement agenda... Read More →
avatar for Mary Ohmer

Mary Ohmer

Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work
I'm the Chair of the Community, Organization, and Social Action Program at the School of Social Work. I collaborate and partner with our Community Engagement Centers on many projects, including one engaging youth and adult residents around equitable development.


Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Workshop: What Anchor Institutions Need to Know about Real Estate: Insights and Best Practices for Creating a Real Estate Plan
The Community Experiences and Deep Dive Workshops are offered at no additional cost to conference attendees. You must be registered for the CUMU 2019 Conference before registering for a Community Experience or Deep Dive Workshop. Seating is limited.

You can complete registration for this program event here.

Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania are leading anchor institutions in Philadelphia, with deep experience in leveraging commercial real estate development to enhance urbanism, quality of life, economic development and placemaking on their campuses and in the communities they serve. With a mix of case studies and interactive breakout groups, you will gain deep insights and best practices from top professionals in the anchor institution real estate field.

Learn from leaders who have been at the forefront of transforming colleges and universities, and their communities, and get one-of-kind insights into how Philadelphia's University City has become a national model.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN 
  • Earning senior-level support from a board and the president’s office about your real estate planning
  • Engaging the local community of neighbors and businesses
  • Attracting private sector investment and building business relationships
  • The ins and outs of managing your properties
  • Building valuable partnerships with local civic and government officials
  • Telling your story—how to leverage marketing and communications
 
PANELISTS
  • Donald Moore, Vice President, Real Estate and Facilities, Drexel University - With more than 35 years of experience in facilities and operations management, master planning, real estate development, and executive leadership, Donald stewards Drexel’s built environment both on and off-campus.
  • Edwin Datz, executive director, Penn Real Estate, University of Pennsylvania With more than 30 years’ experience in real estate and a veteran leader of Penn’s investment in University City, including commercial and residential real estate.
  • Tony Sorrentino, assistant vice president, Office of the Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania - A 20 year veteran of Penn who has led marketing, communications, public affairs for Penn’s urban policy agenda since 2000.

Speakers
TS

Tony Sorrentino

Assistant Vice President, University of Pennsylvania


Monday October 21, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:00pm

Lunch Buffet
Lunch in the Millennium Foyer and Millenium Hall

Monday October 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:00pm

Opening Plenary: Beyond Engagement—The Urban Mission
What does it mean to move beyond engagement and truly realize an urban mission? How do universities position a multi-generational commitment to civic engagement to be both transformative and fully integrated into the core mission of the university?

Join John Fry, President of Drexel University, and Lucy Kerman, Senior Vice Provost for University and Community Partnerships, as they converse with leaders who work to sustain and propel Drexel’s civic engagement mission further—beyond engagement.

Speakers
DD

Dana Dornsife

Lazarex Cancer Foundation
LK

Lucy Kerman

Senior Vice Provost for University and Community Partnerships, Drexel University
JF

John Fry

President, Drexel University


Monday October 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Millennium Hall 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:00pm

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.

Monday October 21, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Fanning the Flame: How CommUniverCity SJSU’s Urban Planning Projects Spark Longstanding Resident and Student Engagement
CommUniverCity SJSU is a nationally recognized public-private partnership led by San Jose State University (SJSU) that spearheads 40 community-engaged learning projects a year in San Jose’s underserved communities. A central goal of CommUniverCity is promoting social capital and improving neighborhood infrastructure.

For the past decade, students in the graduate Community Planning course “adopt” a local neighborhood an undertake a comprehensive analysis of community assets and aspirations with resident leaders, small businesses, and community organizations. Students learn to interview residents using an extensive door-to-door survey, research the area’s history, and identify its unique characteristics. Together they organize a community open house. Neighbors are invited to evaluate and comment on their work. Students prepare a professional-quality report that they turn over to neighborhood association leadership. This document serves as a definitive resource for neighborhood planning.

Previous projects have led to resident- and student-led urban village concepts being adopted as the preferred development model for the City of San Jose’s General Plan. Additionally, relationships created as a result of the class projects have led to spin-off endeavor including pop-up parks, seasonal festivals, and murals. A number of class graduates go on to work as staff in the City of San Jose and continue their relationship with CommUniverCity in their professional capacity. Student assessments overwhelmingly indicate that the experience enhanced their understanding of community issues, assets, and priorities and improved their research and analysis skills to solve real world urban issues. The proposed presentation will provide details on class structure and community partnerships.

Speakers
KC

Katherine Cushing

Executive Director, San Jose State University CommUniverCity
RK

Richard Kos

Professor, San Jose State University


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Informing the Conversation: Elevating an Idea into a Successful Initiative
Session Information:
This session proposal is designed as a behind the scenes look on our College Policy Journal Series initiative has elevated our College’s role as a leader in providing key information for our state. This session will share insights into how this initiative was developed and has been expanded over the years - the call for proposal, budget and funding, writing and editing process, marketing plan, event coordination, training and preparation and more - and how this initiative has allowed our College to help inform the education conversation in Nevada.

Background on Initiative:
The College of Education, University of Nevada Las Vegas is committed to engaging in research and evaluation efforts that align with contemporary legislative issues. As part of a biennial legislative cycle, College faculty and graduate students complete intensive research and complete white papers on key education issues that will be discussed within the Nevada legislature. The individual papers are compiled into a journal and disseminated to a large range of stakeholders including legislators, education organizations, etc. with a focus on sharing timely, relevant, and critical information on specific education related issues. The College has produced three volumes of the Policy Issues in Nevada Education journal within three consecutive legislative sessions. The policy journal series has become a staple in the work of the College and has increasingly gained attention from legislators and key education stakeholders in Nevada and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Bray

Sheila Bray

Director of Strategic Engagement, University of Nevada, Las Vegas College of Education
I am currently the Director of Strategic Engagement and Special Assistant to the Dean in the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. In this position, I lead a team of professionals to best align efforts in student recruitment and engagement, alumni engagement... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

What Did We Learn from Hiring Locally?
The Drexel University College of Medicine has offered employment pipelines to address its costly turnover of Medical Assistants. These entry-level, career-ladder positions in STEM were filled by local hires trained in essential and technical skills by Drexel University Human Resources and the College of Medicine and a nonprofit workforce trainer. In 2019, Drexel will create a local employment pipeline for Patient Service Representatives applying the best practices of the existing program thereby cementing its anchor institution strategy of civic engagement and economic inclusion.

Higher education institutions are called to engage with local communities to serve as anchor institutions. These public purposes are not traditionally related to business practices. This successful project illustrated how institutional business needs connect with community employment needs to create positive outcomes. The unique engagement of Drexel Human Resources to train and employ the community’s most valued resources – people – demonstrates the progress institutions of higher education have made to inform the concepts of community engagement and anchor institution strategy.

This session will examine how the University’s institutional anchor strategy has become embedded into its business operations. Presenters will provide a summary of their institution’s methodology in optimizing these pipelines. Specific focus of the presentation will be dedicated to the positive outcomes of the Medical Assistant pipeline, development of the new Patient Service Representative pipeline, and share best practices that were applied from the Medical Assistant model. Session participants will have multiple opportunities to ask questions, provide feedback, and connect with colleagues during the session.

Speakers
avatar for Soneyet Muhammad

Soneyet Muhammad

Director, Workforce and Economic Inclusion, Drexel University
avatar for Kimberly Gholston

Kimberly Gholston

Assistant Vice President, Human Resources
I have worked at Drexel University for 3 years with a focus on Human Resources Administration. We have committed and engaged resources in efforts to provide skills, development and opportunities for our University City community and surrounding areas. These efforts extend from... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

A Tale of Two Cities
A Tale of Two Cities: How Simon Fraser University forged deep community partnerships in Vancouver and Surrey BC, two very different cities.

Simon Fraser University (SFU) has three campuses. The original location is atop a mountain in suburban Burnaby, and two newer campuses are downtown in nearby cities, Surrey, the largest, fastest-growing city in British Columbia, and Vancouver, a globally recognized, richly diverse metropolis. Surrey is a young city maturing quickly, and Vancouver is well established but facing common urban problems around loneliness, housing affordability and limited civic engagement.

The task in both cities was how best to animate the university's mission to be Canada's most engaged university, and more specifically, in the area of community partnership development. How does a large university create sustainable, authentic, and mutually enhancing relationships with a multitude of potential partner groups in place-based urban environments, in two cites at very different stages of development?

This facilitated workshop will outline key specific steps taken, and lessons learned, in building viable partnerships across a diverse group of community organizations. Participants will also be encouraged to share their own stories and reflections about what works and what does not work in forging authentic university-community partnerships.

Speakers
LA

Laurie Anderson

Executive Director, Simon Fraser University


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Challenges of Reentry: Universities Can Pave the Way to Success for Formerly Incarcerated Students
The beneficial effect of higher education on rates of recidivism has been well documented. To that end, formerly incarcerated students enroll in college hoping to make a new start in life; yet they are faced with unique challenges ranging from using technology to managing social stigma. What can universities do to help ease the reentry process and promote student success? Cal State LA’s Project Rebound is currently balancing the reentry needs of 16 formerly incarcerated short-term offenders and 4 students pipelined from our Prison BA program after serving sentences ranging from 10 to 20 plus years. In the past year, it has become clear that our Project Rebound program is serving two distinct FIP populations with very different needs. Honest and candid dialogue will be facilitated by Cal State LA’s Project Rebound and feature two formerly incarcerated students who will share their first hand experiences, reflections, and suggestions for how any university can assist with the successful reentry of formerly incarcerated persons.

Speakers
avatar for Summer Brantner

Summer Brantner

Program Coordinator, Project Rebound & Lecturer, Sociology, California State University, Los Angeles
Summer Brantner is interested in student success and building bridges within and without the university community. She is the full time Program Coordinator for Project Rebound (PR), a program that supports the successful reentry of formerly incarcerated, aspiring scholars at Cal State... Read More →
avatar for Jeffrey Stein

Jeffrey Stein

Student, California State University, Los Angeles
avatar for Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams

Student, California State University, Los Angeles
Formerly incarcerated student at in his senior year at Cal State Los Angeles


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Jefferson 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: A Procurement Data Story
This workshop is geared towards university administrative staff who are interested in some of the implementation details connected to a local procurement strategy. Where data and reporting is concerned, the information you share is only as good as your data set. This workshop walks participants through our 2018 process of comprehensively cleaning up our procurement data and how we generated analytical filters to better quantify our economic impact locally and with diversity suppliers. The result has been a more accurate account of our local purchasing performance than we have ever had, and this accuracy lets us better understand the kinds of community-facing support programming we can design to further advance our local procurement strategy.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Jones

Julie Jones

Assistant Vice President, Procurement Services
Julie Ann Jones is a Project Management and Procurement Strategist who partners with executives, cross-divisional teams, and external entities to strategically source and manage contractual engagements to the financial and product benefit of her sponsor. Julie has a history of transforming... Read More →



Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Collaborating for Community: The Role of Community Relations and Community Engagement within Higher Education
What is the difference between community relations and community engagement? Where can these two roles collaborate to foster strong, reciprocal relationships between higher education and the communities they serve? Are they really just the same thing?

York University has a long history of Community Engagement initiatives. Very recently, a new Community Relations Unit was formed which necessitated a strategic planning process to guide that work. This raised numerous questions about what community relations means, what the difference is between community relations and community engagement and where the opportunities for collaboration exist. This session will explore these questions as well as the development of the community interaction continuum that looks to answer these queries and ultimately provide a framework to support a coordinated approach between these roles using social justice, equity and inclusion as core values through which to align the work and the benefit of having each of these roles within your institution.

Speakers
avatar for Byron Gray

Byron Gray

Manager, York University
ST

Shawna Teper

Community & Government Relations Officer, York University
Shawna holds a BSW and an MSW from Ryerson University. She began her social work career as a frontline counsellor in a women’s shelter, working with women and children who had survived domestic violence. Subsequently, Shawna spent over ten years as political staff within the City... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Data Collection, Assessment, & Strategic Planning: An Impetus for Institutionalizing Community Engagement
This Lightning Presentation looks at the role of data collection, strategic planning, and assessment of community engagement in working to integrate an institution-wide understanding and approach in meeting the University of Louisville’s metropolitan mission. UofL has established standardized processes to track our work in the community and to assess impact at every level; from the student, faculty, community partner, and individual school and college levels. This Best Practices session will provide an overview of the institutional data collection, strategic planning, and assessment practices for partnerships, outreach, curricular engagement, and engaged scholarship activities. It will look at the significance of planning and assessment for our urban mission, provide examples of how data is used, and will address challenges in the institutionalization and sustainability of these processes.

Speakers
HC

Henry Cunningham

Director of Community Engagement, University of Louisville


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Partnership Agreement: Towson University’s Tool for Managing Expectations and Outcomes
Through BTU: Partnerships at Work for Greater Baltimore, Towson University is moving the dial on capturing, supporting, and sustaining the work taking place with its community partners. Learn about TU's Partnership Agreement, the tool for managing expectations, outcomes, and next steps on behalf of TU and its partners.

Speakers
KC

Kathleen Crostic

Partnerships Manager, Towson University


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Strategically Fostering Community and Faculty Connections: Marquette's President's Challenge
In January, 2018, Marquette University announced the President’s Challenge Award, designed to put the University’s Community Engagement Strategic Plan into action. The Award connects faculty, staff, and students with community partners; each applicant team is required to have faculty from humanities, STEM, and social sciences, and have at least one major community partner. In this presentation, we describe the process of this initiative and the first winner of the award, “Next Step Clinic: A Partnership Targeting Mental and Developmental Health for Milwaukee’s Underserved Children and Families.” Ten Marquette faculty from eight departments and five colleges partnered with Mental Health America of Wisconsin, Next Door Foundation, two area church networks, and other nonprofits to develop the proposal. This proposal will seek out and serve families adversely impacted by racial and socioeconomic health disparities, with a focus on families who are impacted by trauma and developmental delays. The clinic will be located at a community partner, Nextdoor Foundation. Marquette Communications students will build marketing media campaigns, and Marquette Computer Science students will build a software platform to ease communications amongst the team, families, and clinicians. Psychology, Counseling, and Speech Pathology graduate students will provide direct clinical services to families while under the supervision of licensed Marquette clinical faculty. Impacts will include immediate abatement of a community need, while also addressing capacity by training more future clinicians and professionals. Ways in which a university can motivate faculty to partner with community agencies, while fulfilling education and strategic mission initiatives, will be detailed.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Van Hecke

Amy Van Hecke

Associate Professor, Psychology, Marquette University
Dr. Van Hecke is a developmental psychologist, an associate professor of psychology at Marquette University, and Executive Co-director of the Next Step Autism and Trauma Clinic. She studies the effects of evidence-based interventions, for preschoolers, adolescents, and young adults... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Sustaining the Community Engagement Revolution: The Campus Partner Who is All In, but You Might Be Missing
Benjamin Franklin started the first public one right here in Philadelphia.

Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr both patronized the same one in New York City.

Thomas Jefferson said he couldn’t live without the resources that they provide.

America’s founders loved their libraries and anyone partnering with their communities should too. This lightning talk will discuss how one academic library has created and provided resources that have supported, contributed to, and sustained their campus’ community engagement efforts. Attendees will gain ideas on how they can engage their libraries to keep their own partnerships going.

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Garczynski

Joyce Garczynski

Assistant University Librarian for Development & Communication, Towson University
I am a creative thinker with a passion for connecting researchers with the information they need.



Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Lightning Session: Utilizing Technology, Innovation & Entrepreneurship for the Urban College Students-Georgia State University's Student Innovation Fellowship Program & LaunchGSU Student Incubator
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology have all have been identified by urban and metropolitan cities and universities as areas for growth to prepare their students to be contributors to the workforce and the creative economy. Downtown Atlanta is home to a dense community of startups, accelerators, incubators, and maker spaces. In Atlanta over the last three years, Georgia State University has capitalized on these areas to help promote the local economy with the addition of two projects to their campus - The Student Innovation Fellowship Program and LaunchGSU. The Student Innovation Fellowship (SIF) program is a nationally recognized initiative that employs graduate and undergraduate students to collaborate with faculty, staff, and external parties on interdisciplinary and cross-functional research and pedagogy projects. Our public-facing projects combine emerging technologies such as 3D modeling and virtual reality, creative media, and big data.The SIF program supports a growing number of complex technology projects at Georgia State that require skills and collaborations beyond traditional university research practices.The SIF program offers student fellows diverse and exciting pathways to internships, jobs, and further education. LaunchGSU provides GSU students who exhibit an entrepreneurial interest and hustle or actively working on a small business project for a 24 hour 7 days a week incubator space. Students involved in LaunchGSU must be actively involved in Georgia State’s entrepreneurial resources including both clubs and classes and receive technical assistance from staff, faculty and other students.

Speakers
avatar for George R. Greenidge, Jr.

George R. Greenidge, Jr.

Innovation Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Georgia State University
George R. Greenidge, Jr. has served in a number of capacities throughout his career in the fields of non-profit, government, philanthropy, and education. Most recently, he was President of the Boston Empowerment Zone, a federally funded HUD initiative aimed at economic investment... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Responding to Persistent and Emergent Urban Issues Through the Formation of Durable University-Community Partnerships
Urban universities have long worked with other institutions within their communities on a variety of urban issues. Generally, these interactions have been individual projects involving faculty members, their students and a community partner in the nonprofit, government or business sector. These approaches do not usually draw upon different perspectives and disciplines to support a response to the complex persistent and emerging problems of urban regions. Recognizing the limited impact of short-term projects, the Institute for Sustainable Solutions and senior staff in the City of Portland have been working together to develop a more resilient and responsive approach to the complex problems facing the city and its surrounding region. These efforts are based on new ways of working together, new approaches to generating and using data to guide the development of effective policies and practices and new forms of mutual accountability and trust. These partnership activities are part of a broader effort to create more meaningful city-university engagements in cities around the globe. In this session we will discuss the features that are common to these various efforts to create long-term, adaptive partnerships and to sustain this new way of working between city and university actors across time. Participants will be asked to identify an example of a city/university partnership in their own communities and to assess the extent that these partnerships are moving toward a long-term model. With this information, we will then discuss possible next steps in building successful collaborations capable of adapting over time as emerging problems develop.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Ramaley

Judith Ramaley

President Emerita and Distinguished Professor, Portland State University
Dr. Judith A. Ramaley is President Emerita and Distinguished Professor of Public Service at Portland State University in the Mark O. Hatfield School of Government and President Emerita of Winona State University. From 2005-2012, she served as President of Winona State University (WSU... Read More →
FB

Fletcher Beaudoin

Associate Director, Inst Sust Solutions, Portland State University
I work as the Associate Director of the Portland State University Institute for Sustainable Solutions (ISS) where we work with a network of 145 faculty fellows and over 400 student fellows to build learning, research and engagement partnerships between PSU and the community that drive... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Defining Local: Approaches to Institutional Impact and Measurement
Institutions of higher education have vast potential to affect the vitality of the local communities in which they are embedded by applying all their capacities to that end in line with the Anchor Mission. Anchors intentionally apply their institutional effort to this end with varied approaches, and with varied results which are often geographically uneven. Defining the target of local institutional effort presents substantial challenges for institutions in focusing resources to do the most good, navigating relationships with the broader community (especially those left out geographically), measuring that effort and the associated outcomes, among other things.

Five institutions involved in the Anchor Learning Network (ALN) will discuss their approaches to defining local and provide insights into the implications of these decisions on institutional strategy and measurable impact. Their approaches have varied, with some having well established local target geographies when beginning Anchor work while others with more complex situations (and multiple physical locations) have had to approach this decision differently.

A moderated panel discussion with representatives from these five institutions will address relevant topic areas on defining local and aligning measurement and strategy, including:
  • The internal process for defining a local target area
  • Aligning institutional assets to the needs of marginalized communities (and how to handle those excluded from this local definition)
  • Considerations for adaptations or flexibility in defining this area between different efforts within an institution
  • Communication, both internally and externally, about the local target area
  • How defining local can lead to greater collective impacts and policy initiatives

Speakers
avatar for Lorna Schwartzentruber

Lorna Schwartzentruber

Assoc. DIr Access Prog & Comm Engagement, York University
Lorna Schwartzentruber is the Associate Director of Access Programs and Community Engagement in the Office of the Vice-Provost Academic at York University, supporting York’s commitment to build a more engaged university. Prior to that she was Manager of the York-TD Community Engagement... Read More →
avatar for Aloha Balza

Aloha Balza

Community Engagement Coordinator, Florida Atlantic University
Aloha Balza is the Coordinator of the Office of Community Engagement at Florida Atlantic University. Under the guidance of the Executive Director, she assists with the development and management of strategies and policies related to the institution’s community engaged programs... Read More →
KG

Karl Guenther

Community Development Specialist, University of Missouri St. Louis
ES

Ellen Szarleta

Director, CURE, IU Northwest
avatar for Alan Delmerico

Alan Delmerico

Community Health Behavior Scientist, Center for Health and Social Research
Dr. Alan Delmerico is a Community Health Behavior Scientist at the Institute for Community Health Promotion, Center for Health and Social Research. He received a BA/MA in Economics, an MA in Geography, and a PhD in Geography from the University at Buffalo, the State University of... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Commonwealth C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

Forming a Network to Support Anchor Strategies in the New York Metro Region
An underpinning of the anchor mission in higher education is cross-sector collaboration. This presentation features a regional alliance in the New York City metropolitan area fostering precisely that. The Anchor Opportunity Network (“AON”) assists stakeholders to create sustainable partnerships that leverage assets collectively to drive inclusive economic growth. AON convenes public, private, and nonprofit organizations to counter the proclivity to create institutional and public policies in isolation. Rather, it promotes shared learning, coordinated advocacy, and capacity development, replacing endemic isolation with the resources of a network to promote more equitable and strategic investments in underserved communities.

AON’s early impact will be described via two cases: an urban university doing anchor work and a hospital-housing authority partnership, which are among regional collaborators working on cross-sector best practices.

The Vita Health and Wellness initiative harnesses the power of collective action to catalyze Stamford, Connecticut’s commitment to healthful living, reducing health disparities while addressing the social determinants of health. A health-themed neighborhood with a thriving, socially responsible organic farm at its heart, Vita has replaced distressed public housing projects with self-sustaining mixed income communities and an aging hospital with a new, state-of-the art teaching hospital. It features revitalized parks, farm-to-table classes, and a neighborhood association that helps shape the neighborhood to the benefit of all.

Rutgers University – Newark’s anchor work is well known in higher education, grounded in a strategic plan embracing the anchor mission as central.

Representatives of each will discuss their anchor work, AON’s collective effort to create region-wide impact.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Englot

Peter Englot

Sr. Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs, Rutgers University Newark
As Senior Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs and Chief of Staff at Rutgers University – Newark (RU-N), Peter Englot leads the university’s communications efforts and supports Chancellor Nancy Cantor and her leadership team in coordination of activities across their divisions... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Kaplan-Macey

Melissa Kaplan-Macey

VP, State Programs & Connecticut Director, Regional Plan Association
Melissa Kaplan-Macey is responsible for engaging stakeholders and building support for RPA’s programs to expand economic opportunity, improve infrastructure and adapt to climate change across the region and is responsible for leading our research, planning and advocacy activities... Read More →
avatar for Vincent Tufo

Vincent Tufo

Chief Executive Officer, Charter Oak Communities
Vincent J. Tufo                                     Executive Director, Dovetail: SIP, Inc.vtufo@dvtl.orgChief Executive Officer, Charter Oak Communitiesvtufo@charteroakcommunities.orgVincent Tufo is chief executive officer of Charter Oak Communities (COC), formerly the Stamford Housing Authority, a progressive community development organization serving Stamford, Connecticut. Mr. Tufo is also founder and president of Rippowam Corporation, COC’s real estate d... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Commonwealth B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:30pm

The Anchor Institution Road: Where Are We Now?
In 2009, Rita Hodges and Steve Dubb studied ten urban campuses (Cincinnati, Emory, IUPUI, LeMoyne-Owen, Miami-Dade, Minnesota, Penn, Portland State, Syracuse, Yale) to examine the state of community engagement and the anchor institution movement—work that ultimately was published by MSU Press as The Road Half Traveled: University Engagement at a Crossroads. Ten years later, the term “anchor institution” is more common, with over thirty CUMU members having joined an anchor collaborative and hundreds of schools in Campus Compact having created civic action plans.

But are communities benefiting? And is the idea of an anchor institution mission that the authors introduced—namely, a university that consciously and strategically applies the institution’s long-term, place-based economic power, in combination with its human and intellectual resources, to better the welfare of the community in which it resides—being realized?

Moderated by Steve Dubb, the panel will begin with lead author Rita Hodges reflecting on key themes and changes over the past decade. Three field leaders—Marisol Morales from Campus Compact, Chris Nayve from the Mulvaney Center at the University of San Diego, and Katie Parker from The Democracy Collaborative—will serve as respondents. We will then open up to the room to discuss the many successes, pitfalls, and surprises inherent in anchor institution and community engagement work. And we will take stock of where we have been, where we are now, and where we need to go if the promise of fully integrated community engagement work by universities is to be realized.

Speakers
KP

Katie Parker

Senior Research Associate, The Democracy Collaborative
Katie Parker joined The Democracy Collaborative in 2014 and has been working to support the Anchor Learning Network. A primary area of focus has been on how anchor institutions can leverage their business practices, such as procurement, hiring and investment, to build community wealth... Read More →
avatar for Steve Dubb

Steve Dubb

Senior Editor, Nonprofit Quarterly
avatar for Marisol Morales

Marisol Morales

Vice President for Network Leadership, Campus Compact
Marisol Morales serves as the Vice President for Network Leadership for Campus Compact. In this role Morales provides guidance, inspiration, and practical support to network staff across the country, helping state and regional directors achieve local goals while advancing shared network... Read More →
avatar for Rita Hodges

Rita Hodges

Assistant Director, The Netter Center for Community Partnerships
Rita A. Hodges is Assistant Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships at the University of Pennsylvania. Hodges supports all aspects of the Center’s mission and operations to improve the quality of life in the community while simultaneously advancing... Read More →



Monday October 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Innovation through Community Partnership Mapping and Analytics
Partnerships are integral to the ability of higher education institutions to fulfill their urban and metropolitan missions. Yet, a clear understanding about these community partnerships is often lacking.

The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) is a decentralized institution in which community engagement is conceptualized differently in each unit. Yet, it is an institution where partnerships are ingrained in its identity.

Through two graduate-level service-learning capstones, the UNO Community Engagement Measurement and Assessment committee has created the Community Partnership Initiative - an infrastructure that allows for a sophisticated understanding, analytics, and display of community partnerships, projects, issues addressed, complexity levels, geographic locations, legislative districts, types of engagement, and more.

On the micro-level, this tool allows UNO to answer questions and provide complete transparency regarding community partnerships and projects - including responses to the ‘who, why, when, how, and where’ questions.

On the macro-level, the analytical structure has allowed UNO to address strategic questions, including the ability to identify strategic alliances, discuss equity in resources and issues addressed, and provide an innovative framework for measuring impact.

The measurement of impact is the next phase for the committee. We will be implementing an evaluation protocol to measure the partnership outcomes. The categorization of the data allows the committee to quantify the results by issue area (e.g. economic sufficiency, social justice, health and wellness, international service, educational support, and environmental sustainability), geographic location, legislative district, engagement type, and organization types among others.

Speakers
KS

Keristiena S. Dodge

Project Specialist, University of Nebraska at Omaha
avatar for Sachin Pawaskar

Sachin Pawaskar

Faculty, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Monday October 21, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Political Dialogue as a Democratic Act: An Interdisciplinary & Ignatian Civic Engagement Initiative
In an age of political polemics, colleges and universities have a responsibility to foster constructive dialogue on difficult topics among students – and the broader society – comprising different viewpoints and backgrounds. At The University of Scranton, a Political Dialogues Working Group has established a multi-year interdisciplinary, collaborative, and uniquely Ignatian civic engagement initiative to burst political bubbles; the project has involved facilitator training, co-curricular and course-based student dialogues, community-based learning, local and national partnerships, and research activities and outcomes. As a Jesuit institution, the project has been situated in the university’s mission to promote both justice and reconciliation with a focus on creating the conditions for dialogue and in-depth understanding. Student dialogue topics have included immigration, guns, and political correctness/free speech; community-based dialogues have covered issues of race, injustice and community and, “What does it mean to be an American?” National and local partners have included Essential Partners, the American Library Association, Scranton Public Library, and the Greater Scranton Martin Luther King Commission, among others. This presentation will provide concrete learning outcomes regarding how to design effective political dialogues in campus and community settings and engender discussion about such pertinent issues as the difference between debate and dialogue and how dialogue structure/format can address an asymmetry of power among participants.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Schumacher Cohen

Julie Schumacher Cohen

Director of Community & Government Relations, The University of Scranton
Julie Schumacher Cohen is Director of Community and Government Relations at The University of Scranton. In this role, Julie helps strengthen relationships and form partnerships between the University and the community; she has developed special initiatives in areas of downtown business... Read More →
TG

Teresa Grettano

Associate Professor, The University of Scranton
Teresa Grettano is an Associate Professor and the Director of First-Year Writing at the University of Scranton. She also coordinates The Ellacurìa Initiative, charged with raising justice-related issues through curricular and co-curricular projects. Her areas of interest include... Read More →



Monday October 21, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

The Team Approach to Local Hiring
Through collaborations with on-campus and off-campus organizations, the UMB Office of Community Engagement supports three types of initiatives to support the residents of West Baltimore in finding sustainable employment.

Through a collaboration with the Mayor's Office of Employment Development (MOED) and the Southwest Partnership, the UMB Office of Community Engagement runs a weekly, career-focused open house at the Community Engagement Center. Staff from MOED, UMB's Human Resources staffing office, and our office work with community members on a walk-in basis each Wednesday. Individuals can get assistance with online job searches, résumé review, interview skills, and more. To date, we have had more than 300 visits to Workforce Wednesday. More than 100 of those visitors have been hired by a partnering organization.

The Southwest Partnership's Workforce Roundtable runs a community referral program where qualified residents who apply for jobs at Southwest Partnership anchor institutions can get preferred treatment. To date, the anchor institutions participating are UMB and the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Speakers
AV

Ashley Valis

Executive Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore
LR

Lisa Rawlings

Program Manager, UMB


Monday October 21, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:30pm

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.


Monday October 21, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:30pm

Executive Committee Meeting (Invite Only)
Attendance to this event is by invitation only.

Monday October 21, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Commonwealth A2 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

"Wait Until You See My Degree" Campaign at Georgia State University - A Program Highlighting Mentoring and College, Careers, and Community Networks
Georgia State University (GSU) is one of the most diverse universities in the nation: racially, ethnically, culturally, and economically. This year, U.S. News and World Report ranked GSU 2nd in the nation for the most innovative universities and 2nd in the nation for undergraduate education and teaching. GSU leads the country in eliminating disparities in graduation rates based on race or ethnicity, conferring more degrees to African American students than any other non-profit college in the nation.

Greatest MINDS, a nonprofit and student organization, launched a new campaign "WAIT UNTIL YOU SEE MY DEGREE" Campaign on Georgia State University's campus. We, as a graduate and undergraduate students at GSU partner with staff members, students, faculty and an alumni by connecting first generation college students to college, career and community networks. This initiative utilizes multimedia, conferences, workshops, public forums, and peer mentoring to help students develop new networks to navigate the college experience.

Greatest MINDS partners with and is composed of Georgia State University staff, students, faculty, alumni and community members. Our mission is to provide mentorship and guidance to citizens and first-generation college students seeking to become active and successful contributors to civil society by giving them access to college, career and community networks. We achieve this by promoting intergenerational dialogue through developing programs, forums, initiatives, campaigns and conferences which highlight the issues of race, socio-economic class, and gender identity in urban cities and on college campuses.

Speakers
avatar for George R. Greenidge, Jr.

George R. Greenidge, Jr.

Innovation Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Georgia State University
George R. Greenidge, Jr. has served in a number of capacities throughout his career in the fields of non-profit, government, philanthropy, and education. Most recently, he was President of the Boston Empowerment Zone, a federally funded HUD initiative aimed at economic investment... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Civic Engagement in an Anchor Institution: Lines of Strategic Convergence in an Urban-Serving, Public Research University
The presentation will outline how a Midwestern urban-serving, public research university created a Civic Engagement skill area in its General Education (GE) program to enact upon its anchor institution designation in the surrounding metropolitan region. Connecting undergraduate curricula to community development and economic growth is a critical component of our institutional effort. Expectations derived from the new GE program skill area relate to empowering graduates to demonstrate significant leadership and community-building contributions in all aspects of life outside of school.

Speakers
MB

Marius Boboc

Vice Provost, Cleveland State University



Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

From Tree Branches to Career Branches: Developing Pathways to Sustainable Employment for Returning Citizens
Temple University’s Vocational Certificate in Urban Greening and Sustainable Landcare is at the intersection of two major concerns for the University and the City of Philadelphia: sustainability and green industries, and sustainable career paths for returning citizens. The program provides multiple entry points into green industries that are vital to Philadelphia’s mission of sustainability, by combining skills-based experiential training and job readiness curricula for students at the Philadelphia Department of Prisons with post-release paid internships.

This presentation will provide an overview of the Vocational Certificate in Urban Greening and Sustainable Landcare, and the specific elements that address barriers faced by returning citizens. We’ll cover the program’s skills-based experiential model; individualized learning opportunities; and the wide range of partners involved in facilitating the program (including the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Get Healthy Philly, the Mayor’s Office of Reintegration Services, and the Defender Association), enabling both expert instruction and access to a broad support network for students returning to their communities. We’ll also discuss the paid post-release internships, designed to strengthen the connection between the program’s learning objectives and their implementation in the workplace.

By sharing best practices and lessons learned, we aim to facilitate discussion around the ways in which higher education institutions can best serve students re-entering urban communities and workforces. Through creative instructional design and the development of partnerships with diverse organizations, we can develop programs that integrate industry-specific competencies with the skills and networks needed to tackle the numerous barriers faced by returning citizens.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Williams

Vanessa Williams

Instructional Designer/Trainer, Temple University
Vanessa Williams is the Instructional Designer and Trainer for Temple University’s Off-Campus Programs and Training. She completed her PhD at the University of Pennsylvania in August 2017. Vanessa currently oversees off-campus corporate and community training programs, and works... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Westrick

Nicole Westrick

Associate Vice Provost, University College, Temple University



Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Census 2020: The Important Role of an Urban Institution
What is your institution doing to support a fair and thorough count in the 2020 census? How might your students, faculty, and staff get involved to support an accurate census? Colleges and universities in urban locations have a particular responsibility to ensure that hard to count neighborhoods are accurately reflected in the 2020 census, and there are significant opportunities to support community organizations working to address this critical priority. Join this community conversation to share your institution’s plans and strategies, learn from others about opportunities and approaches, and be inspired to support the census 2020 effort.

Speakers
avatar for Aurora Schunk

Aurora Schunk

Assistant Director, Civic and Community Engagement
avatar for Laura Rao

Laura Rao

Director, Civic and Community Engagement



Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Jefferson 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: A University and School District Partnership: Transforming School L.I.F.E. for English Learners
Over the past 10 years, the population of English Learners (ELs) in Pennsylvania schools has increased 114 percent, and the number of ELs enrolled in the School District of Philadelphia has soared to 11,000 students—over 12 percent of the District’s students. Historically, efforts to address the unique needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students have focused on training classroom teachers. However, research suggests that in order to fully maximize the opportunities for student learning, training and resources that elevate the status and support for bilingual students must be extended beyond the classroom.

Three years ago, Temple University received a National Professional Development grant to support Philadelphia’s ongoing efforts to improve the school experiences and academic achievements for middle and high school ELs. The program, “Transforming School L.I.F.E. (Leadership, Instruction, and Family Engagement) for English Learners,” is a three-pronged, comprehensive, professional development effort. Consisting of intensive training for in-service teachers, through Temple’s PA ESL Certificate Program, as well as on-site coaching for school leaders and on-site English language instruction to parents of ELs.

This presentation will specifically address the collaborative effort with the School District of Philadelphia and other community partners, as well as the program design, specialized tools, and successes. Attendees will be encouraged to consider how this and/or similar models could be replicated in their settings.

Speakers
avatar for Megeara Mabry

Megeara Mabry

Program Manager, Temple University
I work in the College of Education at Temple University as the Program Manager for the Transforming School LIFE for English Learners program, a U.S. Department of Education grant-funded professional development program in the School District of Philadelphia. I oversee the implementation... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: Applying the Lean Startup Methodology to Build a Financially Sustainable Anchor Collaborative
As poverty and inequality continue to plague American cities, universities and hospitals are looking for ways to leverage their role as community anchors to address these issues. Local procurement programs have emerged as one way for institutions to build local wealth and create jobs. In order to increase the impact of individual institutions, many cities are creating place-based collaboratives to amplify the impact of individual anchors. However, because collaboratives focus on systems-level change, which can take many years to achieve, they frequently struggle to raise and sustain necessary levels of funding.

The presenter will share best practices gleaned from launching Philadelphia’s anchor collaborative, Philadelphia Anchors for Growth and Equity (PAGE), run by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia. She will discuss how the Lean Startup methodology, an approach that focuses on gradual growth using validated learning, helped PAGE make the jump from a policy paper to an operating initiative. The presenter will discuss the report that sparked city-wide interest in creating an anchor collaborative, how early wins helped launch PAGE and how to leave room for experimentation in a way that delivers results, while allowing the collaborative to evolve. The goal of the presentation is to share a strategic planning framework that could be useful in creating financially sustainable and effective local purchasing collaboratives.

The presentation is based on a March 2019 article in the Metropolitan Universities Journal titled Philadelphia Anchors for Growth and Equity: Applying the Lean Startup Methodology to Build a Financially Sustainable Anchor Collaborative.

Speakers
avatar for Mariya Khandros

Mariya Khandros

Director of Shared Solutions, Economy League of Greater Philadelphia
Mariya Khandros is the Director of Shared Solutions at the Economy League. Her primary responsibility is to oversee the development and implementation of Philadelphia Anchors for Growth and Equity, a project focused on increasing local purchasing by Philadelphia’s hospitals, universities... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: Connecting All the Pieces of the Puzzle: Engaging Parents, Families, and Community Partners
There is an old African proverb that reads, “It takes a village to raise a child.” The same is true for Colleges and Universities that work to successfully graduate students. It takes the parents, families, the community and institutions of higher education working together to help students achieve their fullest potential.

The most important piece of this puzzle, outside of the students, are the parents and/or families of students. If we don’t have buy-in prior to and when a student is in school from parents/families, a student’s chances of success drastically diminish. This workshop will explore how to engage parents and families through K12 schools, faith-based institutions, community centers and community partners invested in their children’s education.

Topics will include:

  • Facilitating parent-focused workshops on financial aid;
  • Collaborating with Community Based Organizations to work with middle and high school students and their families on “how to prepare for college.”
  • Partnering with faith-based organizations and community centers to discuss college access and navigating the college admissions process.

Participants will also have an opportunity to share strategies that have worked within their respective Colleges and Universities for engaging parents, families, and community partners to help students achieve academic success.

Speakers
CW

Caroline Waters

SENIOR EOF COUNSELOR, Rutgers University - Camden


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: Sankofa and Movement Building with the Council of Elders
The Egan Office has a rich history of integrating academic excellence with authentic community engagement. Our students are situated front and center on critical issues confronting our schools and communities and grapple with the idea of social justice in those spaces. We welcome the role that elders play in Chicago communities. Traditionally, Elders are the wisdom-keepers and caretakers of the sacred teachings, experiences, and stories. The Egan Office recognizes the intellectual, scholarly and cultural contributions of these Elders that have been on the frontline of historic social change in Chicago and continue to play, an active role in politics, education, and the environment. The Council of Elders works closely with Egan’s staff and students to share their collective wisdom and knowledge to reinforce the vision and mission statement of the Egan Office. These conversations culminate into action as elders and students mobilize on issues such as authentic civic engagement and the role of the citizen, and informed Chicago election activism and critical parent engagement in Chicago's deeply segregated communities. DePaul University Egan Office of Urban Education and Community Partnership and University partner National Louis University provides a shared space for ideas, collaboration, and advocacy for the Council of Elders. The Council helped to reimagine intergenerational advocacy for social justice and the role of the University as a viable "safe" space. The Council is driven by a deep commitment to social justice and grounded in the time-tested principles, strategies, accomplishments, and approaches of community organizing.

Speakers
avatar for John Zeigler

John Zeigler

Director, DePaul University Egan Office of Urban Education and Community Partnership
Interested in sustainable asset based approaches to community building and how it impacts public schools. I’m a Chicago White Sox fan who enjoys a good Cuban cigar and international travel


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: Strategies to Support Creative Economic Growth
The creative economy has become one of the most interesting economic development concept models of the new millennium spreading wide and far, particularly within urban areas. Although it is a fuzzy term that continues to evolve, it is usually used to refer to goods and services originating from the arts and cultural enterprises. One thing is clear though, the creative economy has become a powerful engine of growth and community vitality and a catalyst for urban economic development. Over the past decade, interest in the creative economy has increased as it has been linked to robust economic ecosystems and attraction of educated and high-skilled workforces. With this in mind, the Small Business Development Center at Florida Atlantic University (SBDC at FAU), has developed a series of strategies to support and further nurture the growing creative economy of the South Florida Region.

This presentation will cover two of the SBDC at FAU strategies in support of creative economies. One is a partnership with the Broward County Cultural Division. This partnership resulted in the planning and delivery of the Artists as Entrepreneur Institute (AEI), which has assisted over 700 artists since its inception. The other, a partnership with the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, resulting in the making the AEI a for-credit course aimed at providing recent FAU graduates with the needed tools to be successful creative entrepreneurs.

Speakers
avatar for Aloha Balza

Aloha Balza

Community Engagement Coordinator, Florida Atlantic University
Aloha Balza is the Coordinator of the Office of Community Engagement at Florida Atlantic University. Under the guidance of the Executive Director, she assists with the development and management of strategies and policies related to the institution’s community engaged programs... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Lightning Session: Telling the Story: Place Branding and Anchor Mission
Cal State LA’s identity as an anchor institution is woven throughout its logos, symbols, taglines, videos, stories, and messages. Incorporating the anchor mission narrative into these various forms of representation helps shape, reflect, and reinforce the university’s anchor identity.

Central to Cal State LA’s branding and identity building is its relationship to its community: 83% of students come from Los Angeles, including 75% from within a 14-mile radius of the campus. Roughly 70% of alumni reside in Los Angeles. The university’s main logo consists of a shield depicting the city’s skyline, with high-rises ascending upward meant to invoke a limitless future

A foundational idea has been the consistent, university-wide application of messaging emphasizing community and student success. University President William A. Covino launched the effort with his focus on “engagement, service, and the public good.” More recently, messaging has incorporated the tagline “Cal State LA is ranked number one in the United States for the upward mobility of its students.” Place helps brand the university’s first comprehensive fundraising campaign, We Are LA: The Campaign for Cal State LA.

We propose a Lightning Presentation on the impact of place branding on the mission of anchor institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Lopez

Robert Lopez

Executive Director for Communication, California State University Los Angeles
Robert Lopez is the executive director for communications and public affairs at Cal State LA. His office oversees media relations, public affairs, social media, website design, university branding and messaging for the president and senior leadership. Prior to that, he was an adjunct... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Community Learning Exchange (CLE): Exploring Racial Identity and Collective Healing
In 1903, W.E.B DuBois declared, “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line” (DuBois, 1903), and his words ring prophetic as they aptly apply to the 21st century in the United States. In an attempt to address the issue of the color line, this innovative workshop will create a gracious space for participants to explore issues of race, racial identity, and healing. In this session we acknowledge race as a social construct and it will be systematically explored through the use of the ecologies of knowing self (primarily), organization, and community (Guajardo & Guajardo, 2013; Omi & Winant, 2015; Guajardo, Guajardo, Janson & Militello, 2016). While a comprehensive study of the self must address the individual’s positionality within their organization, community, and socio-historical context, we offer participants the opportunity to zero in on the “self” ecology of knowing in order to author their own stories within the context of many other stories. In addition to storytelling, this dynamic-critical pedagogy allows participants to learn from one another, struggle with issues of becoming, and construct a framework for crossing borders and building bridges. Although the threat of racism and the institution of harmful racial projects is ever-present, we will pose questions that not only lead to critical conversations, but to collective problem solving and healing as well.

Speakers
MG

Miguel Guajardo

professor, Texas State University
OH

Orlando Hinojosa

Graduate Student, Texas State University
SB

Sascha Betts

Graduate Student, Texas State University


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Creating Connection Using Trauma-Informed and Restorative Practice Approaches
Today’s youth are increasingly exposed to first- and second-hand experiences of trauma. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) estimates that about 37% of youth have experienced a physical assault and 15% have experienced maltreatment by a care-giver in a one-year period. Furthermore, race, gender, and poverty status increase these chances exponentially. This means that, more than ever before, college-age students are dealing with traumatic exposure and the possible consequence of trauma. These consequences include: increased chances of mental health issues, suicidal ideation, missed days of school and work, challenges learning, withdrawal from peer-supports and adult mentors, and substance use. Urban colleges and universities are uniquely placed to be able to reach students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are at-risk of drop out from college. Understanding and addressing trauma is critical to keep students connected to valuable opportunities, like school and work experiences, that are necessary for personal and professional well-being later in life.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Hall

Tracy Hall

Executive Director, Office of Metropolitan Impact, University of Michigan-Dearborn
opportunity youth; conservation-related urban collective impact; Carnegie Classification; boundary spanner roles in higher education;
avatar for Jessica Camp

Jessica Camp

Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Michigan-Dearborn
Dr. Jessica K. Camp is an assistant professor of social work in the Department of Health and Health Services at the University of Michigan- Dearborn. She is licensed by the State of Michigan as a social worker for clinical and macro practices, is a Certified Advanced Addiction and... Read More →
MM

Molly Manley

Assistant Director, Office of Metropolitan Impact, University of Michigan-Dearborn



Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Design Thinking for Social Change
This workshop will focus on the practice of incorporating design thinking methodology into the classroom to engage students in social change. The Department of Community Engagement at Point Park University uses design thinking methods in courses ranging from the first-year to the PhD as a way to encourage students to innovate social solutions for their community.

The University's First-Year Experience course, City-University Life 101, provides students with an innovative and experiential way to engage with the Pittsburgh community and become agents of change. Through administration of this course all first-year students are exposed to service-learning, social innovation and change. The course incorporates design thinking into a required assignment for the class, a Social Impact project poster. In completing this assignment, students identify a community, research the prevalent social issues within that community, and develop project proposals with potential solutions to address these needs. Assessment data from the course indicates students have responded positively to the addition of design thinking as pedagogy and are more likely to understand the importance of advocating for a healthy community.

The facilitators for the workshop will provide participants with an overview of design thinking, and how it is incorporated into the UNIV 101 course. Participants will then be led through a series of design thinking methods, and provided with ways to implement design thinking into their courses. Participants will leave with a concrete understanding of design thinking as a pedagogical tool.

Speakers
HF

Heather Fiedler

Department Chair, Community Engagement, Point Park University
ML

Meggan Lloyd

PhD Candidate, Community Engagement, Point Park University


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Moving the Needle: Driving Economic Growth through Local Hiring Initiatives of Anchor Institutions
Partnerships that include anchor institutions, small businesses, service provider networks, local residents, researchers, philanthropists and other funders can effectively impact the economic vitality and quality of life of neighborhoods. Temple University in North Philadelphia and the University City District in West Philadelphia have developed dynamic partnerships, resulting in successful training and employment opportunities for local residents.

Through intentional coordination and alignment among the workforce, economic development, and education sectors, these two institutions are driving equitable economic growth in low-income communities. Both are focusing on creating career pathway programs within various high growth industries including health, education, and information technology. Using a data-driven framework, these two universities are taking more strategic approaches to using city, university and community assets, but in different ways and for complex reasons.

The panel presentation will be moderated by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia. Panelists will be representing Temple University and the University City District, as well as a local foundation. The panelists will respond to questions which spur discussions that relate to motives for involvement, types of data that drive strategy development, efforts and systems to promote local hiring by anchor institutions, benefits and challenges to forging partnerships, funding opportunities, alignment of efforts with city plans, and establishing a common set of indicators of success.

Speakers
WS

Wes Somerville

Director, Lenfest Foundation
avatar for Shirley Moy

Shirley Moy

Executive Director, LNPWI, Temple University
NF

Nick Frontino

Managing Director, Projects & Operations, Economy League of Greater Philadelphia
SS

Sarah Steltz

Vice President of Workforce Solutions, University City District
MB

Matthew Bergheiser

President, University City District


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Commonwealth B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:45pm

Urban & Metropolitan Universities as Engines for Democratic Engagement in 2020
Given the perceived decline in civic participation practitioners will discuss how student democratic engagement efforts in the higher education context connect with civic institutions and public discourse along with elected officials, ballot initiatives, and voting. Panelists bring a range of perspectives from the community college and public and private university contexts along with nonpartisan nonprofit organizations that have supported their efforts to institutionalize voter registration, voter education, and voter turnout at their campuses. Based on the contentiousness of recent national elections and confusion reported by new participants in the voting process panelists and participants will discuss lessons learned from past nonpartisan student democratic engagement efforts and planning underway for the 2020 elections, a truly massive election cycle as a presidential election year as well as the elections that will determine who leads redistricting efforts in states across the country following the decennial census. Campus-based panelist come from institutions with civic engagement centers and will discuss what this has meant for their institutions, how participants can connection with centers at their own institutions, and efforts to build campus-wide coalition of administrators, faculty, and student leaders to foster a culture of democratic engagement across an institution. The panel discussion will be very timely for participants as the timeline required to build coalitions and integrate democratic engagement efforts into existing campus programs and communications should begin months before Election Day.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Johnson Kebea

Jennifer Johnson Kebea

Executive Director, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement, Drexel University
Dr. Jennifer Johnson Kebea has been part of Drexel University’s expanding efforts around civic engagement since 2009. Currently, Jennifer serves as Executive Director of the Lindy Center for Civic Engagement. She is also affiliated faculty with Drexel University's School of Education... Read More →
avatar for Mike Burns

Mike Burns

Director, Campus Vote Project
avatar for Johanna Mudry

Johanna Mudry

State Director, Campus Election Engagement Project
Johanna is an experienced and dedicated intrapreneur. For the past fifteen years, she’s worked to improve communities and serve those with greatest need. She’s made social change her prime focus since graduating from Eastern University with an M.S. in Nonprofit Management. Earlier... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Lopez

Michelle Lopez

Manager, Community Engagement and Civic Leadership, Community College of Philadelphia
Higher education and non-profit professional with over a decade of experience in volunteer management, event planning, community engagement, relationship building, marketing and fundraising. Proud Latina serving the Philadelphia community, passionate about encouraging local students... Read More →
avatar for Dave Dulio

Dave Dulio

Director, Center for Civic Engagement, Oakland University
David A. Dulio is Professor of Political Science Department and Director of the Center for Civic Engagement at Oakland University. He teaches courses on campaigns and elections, Congress, political parties, interest groups, and other areas of American politics. Dulio has published... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Commonwealth C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:15pm

A Partnership Between Local Education Agencies (LEA) and an Educator Preparation Program at a Four-Year Metropolitan Public University.
In today’s Education Preparation Programs, there must be a focus on developing and enhancing strong partnerships to ensure teacher candidates are ready to teach on day one. Teacher preparation programs in a Metropolitan University need district-level partnerships in order to produce effective teachers within our respective cities. Mutually beneficial relationships between teacher preparation programs and local school districts require a commitment from both. An authentic partnership reflects a commitment for stable, long-term mutually beneficial arrangements characterized by shared decision-making and resources (Holen & Yunk, 2014).

Key leaders on teacher preparation have identified characteristics of the most effective programs. Linda Darling-Hammond (2006) recognizes three main components of successful programs: 1) a strong connection between coursework and fieldwork; 2) intensely supervised clinical work integrated with coursework and 3) closer proactive relationships with schools that serve diverse learners.

This presentation will highlight the process of developing and strengthening a partnership between an Educator Preparation Program (EPP) at a four-year metropolitan public university, and a county-wide local Education Agencies (LEA). The partnership includes a complete redesign of the teacher preparation program within the institution. The LEAs have worked alongside the EPP to ensure the implementation of a new Residency Program, Co-Teaching support for mentor teachers, edTPA and an Induction program. Additionally, institutional support for the program has been increasingly supportive. This session will provide attendees with recommendations in the process of transforming partnerships between teacher preparation program and LEAs.

Speakers
KW

Kim Wingate

Associate Professor, UTC School of Education


Monday October 21, 2019 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:15pm

Building a User-Centered System to Measure Community Engagement Activity in Pittsburgh
Many universities want to develop a comprehensive, publicly accessible listing of their community engagement activities. Efforts vary from utilizing vended products to designing home-grown systems. This presentation will share the University of Pittsburgh’s efforts to develop an open-source engagement and outreach database and mapping tool using in-house staff, user-centered design techniques, and stakeholder engagement processes.

At Pitt, the intent of the tool is to aid in storytelling, find university or community partners, document benefits of university collaboration, and foster collaboration across campus. Based upon a prototype developed by graduate students in 2017-18, the tool is being developed by staff at the University’s Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR). In the presentation, attendees will learn more about how UCSUR employed user-centered design processes in the project redesign. Semi-structured stakeholder interviews and hands-on activities were conducted to learn more about the needs of users in the Chancellor’s office, academic departments, and community organizations. These interviews and activities also helped inform efforts to create a common definition of community engagement at the University. Our presenters will also discuss how agile product development methods were used to collect and incorporate feedback from users throughout the development process. They will also discuss how UCSUR is approaching maintenance of the database and tool.

Speakers
SS

Steven Saylor

Research Programmer, University of Pittsburgh
avatar for Robert Gradeck

Robert Gradeck

Regional Data Center Project Director, University of Pittsburgh - UCSUR
Bob Gradeck manages the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center at the University of Pittsburgh’s University Center for Urban and Social Research. Bob also takes the lead role in building relationships with data publishers and users, and also is responsible for Data Center community... Read More →


Monday October 21, 2019 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:15pm

Why Can't I? University Access for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD)
Hurricane Harvey wreaked havoc for many people living in the Houston region. The outpouring of support that followed brought with it many opportunities for renewal. Through a workforce development grant, and in partnership with a local community organization, the University of Houston Downtown created a program to address the workforce needs of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. With the support of UHD student mentors, this three semester, continuing education program gave participants their first ever opportunity to attend classes on a college campus, engage in a paid on campus internship, a paid off campus externship, a capstone class and graduation ceremony.

Speakers
SV

Steven Villano

Director, Center for Public Service, University of Houston - Downtown
Connecting the college to the community. How can students get real world learning experiences and how can faculty and community and government organizations along with businesses collaborate for the betterment of everyone.


Monday October 21, 2019 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:45pm

30th Anniversary Celebration Reception
Join us on the 33rd floor of the Loew's Hotel to close out the first day of the conference with networking before heading out for dinner and enjoying our host city.

Monday October 21, 2019 4:45pm - 6:30pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

6:00pm

Presidents Dinner (Invite Only)
This event is co-sponsored by Campus Philly, The CEO Council for Growth, and PHENND.


Monday October 21, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
 
Tuesday, October 22
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Breakfast in the Millennium Hall

Tuesday October 22, 2019 7:30am - 9:00am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

7:30am

Registration
Tuesday October 22, 2019 7:30am - 4:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Poster Session
Below is a list of all poster presentations and their presenters. Posters will be available to view in the Millennium and Commonwealth Foyers.  

To view the abstracts of each presentation check out the pdf attached:

A Pilot Program with Win-Win Potential: Leveraging Employee Engagement Efforts to Institutionalize the Urban MissionSarah Hokenmaier & Phyllis Lovito, University of Maryland, Baltimore

Addressing Food Insecurity Amongst Urban University StudentsChristopher Simenz, Marquette University

Let’s Play… Votes & Ballots! Creating Quality Action Plans for Democratic Engagement through GamificationEmily Giffin, Democracy Works & Ryan Drysdale, ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge

 Community Research Advisory Groups as a Method to Increase the Value of, and Participation in Community Research ActivitiesStephen Kauffman & Jenny Wyatt, Widener University

Using a Social Determinants of Health Lens to Forge Partnerships and Strengthen CommunitiesLogan Vetrovec, Virginia Commonwealth University & Anne Massey, VCU Health

Building a Platform for Community-Driven Collective ActionYusuf Alam, University of British Columbia

Connections, Collaboration, and Commitment – The Hallmarks of Penn Purchasing ServicesColleen Reardon, University of Pennsylvania

The Fitz Center for Leadership in Community: Building Strong Community Partnerships and Cultivating Meaningful Student ExperiencesCarly Hall, University of Dayton

The Dual Purpose of Dual Enrollment for At Risk StudentsBarbara Priestap & Dan Hicks, Gannon University

Tearing Down Walls: Civic Engagement in an Urban Academic LibraryZara Wilkinson & Bart Everts, Rutgers University-Camden

Grads2Careers: A Model for Urban SynergyJohn Brenner, University of Baltimore & Janelle Gendrano, Baltimore's Promise

PROmoting School-Community-University Partnerships to Enhance Resilience (PROSPER) in OhioGabrielle Glenn, The Ohio State University

From Impactful Classes to Rewarding Careers: Faculty Influence on Students’ Career Readiness and SatisfactionCharity Peak, Association of College and University Educators & Brian Clocksin, University of La Verne

Out of the Display Case & Into the Community: Fostering Civic Engagement Through Library ExhibitsJohn Powell, Rutgers University-Camden

Mamelodi Pre-University Academy: Aligning a Campus’ Strategic Goals to Achieve its Anchor Institution Strategy MandateKgadi Mathabathe & Nthabiseng Ogude, University of Pretoria

Promoting Carbon-Free Fuel in East LA: K-16 Outreach and Education at the Cal State LA Hydrogen Research and Refueling FacilityAgustin Cervantes, & Marisela Cervantes, California State University, Los Angeles

West Philadelphia Promise Neighborhood: Making Sure Our Children are Ready for SuccessMaria Walker & Rachel Viddy, Drexel University

Creating Collective Impact: The Rutgers University–Camden Civic Action PlanMichael D'Italia, Rutgers University-Camden

 "Wait Until You See My Degree" Campaign at Georgia State University - A Program Highlighting Mentoring and College, Careers, and Community NetworksGeorge Greenidge, Jr. & Jerome Miller, Georgia State University

Practice in Partnership: How a University School of Education Can Collaborate with a Community School to Achieve Dual SuccessNancy Morris & Hannah Rhodes, Gannon University

Funneling Approach to Collaborative Problem SolvingCelene Kalivoda, Gannon University

Using Prediction-Based Propensity Score Matching to Measure Student Success Related to ASL ParticipationAloha Balza, Florida Atlantic University

Grounding Service-Learning Theory and Practice in Las VegasRian Satterwhite & Tamara Marino, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Pennsylvania Voting Laws and Student DisenfranchisementEva Gonzalez, University of Pennsylvania

Asset-Based Community Development: Developing Strategies for Urban Universities to Employ ABCD with a Critical LensHoward Rosing, DePaul University

Just Be Yourself: A Community-Engaged Project to Enhance Teens’ Strategies for Preventing Violence within Their RelationshipsKristin Haglund, Marquette University

 From the Ground Up: Building an Anchor InstitutionTiana Nelson & Sarah Miley, Colorado State University System

  • Innovating Civic Engagement in STEM: Hands-on Experiences in Rehabilitation Engineering Program (HERE) Samuel Landsberger, California State University, Los Angeles

Speakers
avatar for Tiana Nelson

Tiana Nelson

Director of External Relations, Colorado State University System
The Colorado State University System will begin construction on an urban campus - the CSU Campus at the National Western Center - in early 2020. We are already underway developing relationships, partnerships, and educational opportunities in the community, reflective of what we will... Read More →
SM

Sarah Miley

Administative Assistant, Colorado State University System
avatar for Marisela Cervantes

Marisela Cervantes

Doctoral Student, Cal State L.A.
avatar for Carly Hall

Carly Hall

Graduate Assistant, Comm. Engaged Learning, University of Dayton
avatar for Hannah Rhodes

Hannah Rhodes

Student & Teacher Candidate, Gannon University
I’m a Senior at Gannon University studying Early Ed./SPED. I’m also a certified Yoga Teacher and the Programs Manager of a local nonprofit.
avatar for Agustin Cervantes

Agustin Cervantes

Director, Student Services, Cal State LA
Agustín Cervantes currently serves as the Director of Student Services for the Charter College of Education at Cal State University, Los Angeles. In this capacity, he is responsible for the management and leadership of all functions pertaining to outreach, community relations, advisement... Read More →
avatar for Aloha Balza

Aloha Balza

Community Engagement Coordinator, Florida Atlantic University
Aloha Balza is the Coordinator of the Office of Community Engagement at Florida Atlantic University. Under the guidance of the Executive Director, she assists with the development and management of strategies and policies related to the institution’s community engaged programs... Read More →
AM

Anne Massey

Director, Sponsored Projects and Program Planning, VCU Health
avatar for Christopher Simenz

Christopher Simenz

Clinical Professor, Marquette University
Dr. Simenz currently works in a collaborative, community engaged research (CEnR) team to study systems and policy change around obesity reduction/prevention, wellness, food security, homelessness and health access/navigation focused on underserved populations in Milwaukee's central... Read More →
avatar for Tamara Marino

Tamara Marino

Education & Information Officer, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Tamara Marino joined UNLV’s Office of Community Engagement in 2016 and serves as an Education & Information Officer to support, facilitate, and promote collaboration, partnership, and engagement between the university and its many communities. Her work focuses on educating community... Read More →
avatar for Rian Satterwhite

Rian Satterwhite

Director, Service Learning and Leadership, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Service-learning, critical service-learning, community partnerships, campus policies, civic and democratic engagement, leadership development
avatar for Logan Vetrovec

Logan Vetrovec

Director, Campus-Community Partnerships, VCU
I am responsible for developing and administering holistic approaches to community engagement within the health sciences arena through building coalitions among campus-community stakeholders, including management of the VCU/VCUHS Health Equity Strategic Plan. I am also responsible... Read More →
avatar for Michael D'Italia

Michael D'Italia

Program Coordinator, Rutgers University–Camden, Office of Civic Engagement
Michael D'Italia is the program coordinator for engaged civic learning for the Office of Civic Engagement at Rutgers University-Camden. In this role, he works with Rutgers faculty and local community and nonprofit organizations to design, facilitate, and assess courses where students... Read More →
avatar for Yusuf Alam

Yusuf Alam

Associate Director, University of British Columbia - Centre for Community Engaged Learning
Excited about building communities where we can live, love and laugh together. My daily effort includes sharing in the work to build meaningful university-community relationships that harness existing community strengths and resources while addressing our collective, complex social... Read More →
avatar for George R. Greenidge, Jr.

George R. Greenidge, Jr.

Innovation Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Georgia State University
George R. Greenidge, Jr. has served in a number of capacities throughout his career in the fields of non-profit, government, philanthropy, and education. Most recently, he was President of the Boston Empowerment Zone, a federally funded HUD initiative aimed at economic investment... Read More →
KH

Kristin Haglund

Professor, Marquette University
avatar for Dr. Jeannette Wyatt

Dr. Jeannette Wyatt

Associate Professor, Widener University, Center for Social Work Education
Dr. Wyatt is a faculty member in the Center for Social Work at Widener University and teaches in the Masters and Doctoral programs. She has worked with various populations in inpatient mental health and drug and alcohol, outpatient mental health, residential services, child welfare... Read More →
SK

Stephen Kauffman

Professor, Widener University
avatar for Charity Peak

Charity Peak

Academic Director, ACUE
Dr. Charity Peak is an Academic Director at the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE). With 20 years of broad-based curriculum design and teaching experience ranging from Pre-K to graduate school, Peak is passionate about student success and faculty development.
NA

Nthabiseng Audrey Ogude

Dean and Professor of Science Education, , Mamelodi Campus, University of Pretoria
I am Dean and Professor of Science Education at the University of Pretoria's (UP) Mamelodi Campus in Pretoria South Africa. UP is a historically advantaged and largest research intensive university in South Africa with over 50 000 students. My main responsibility is to oversee the... Read More →
avatar for Kgadi Mathabathe

Kgadi Mathabathe

Head of Community Based Research, University of Pretoria
avatar for Emily Giffin

Emily Giffin

Campus Partnerships Manager, Democracy Works
avatar for Rachel Viddy

Rachel Viddy

Project Director, West Philly Promise Neighborhood, Drexel University
avatar for Sarah Hokenmaier

Sarah Hokenmaier

Director of Operations, Department of Family & Community Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing
DH

Daniel Hicks

GO College Assistant Director, Gannon University
ZW

Zara Wilkinson

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Rutgers University-Camden
GG

Gabrielle Glenn

Prevention Coordinator, The Ohio State University
JP

John Powell

Reference/Instruction Librarian, Rutgers-Camden; Paul Robeson Library
NM

Nancy Morris

Instructor, Gannon University
CK

Celene Kalivoda

Assistant Professor, Gannon University
SL

Samuel Landsberger

Faculty, California State University, Los Angeles
Minds, Hands and Hearts-on Learning through Rehabilitation and Sustainable Energy projects to serve the community. Also, use of these Service Learning vehicles to enhance learning and mastery of the fundamental study, engineering, mathematics and physics skills.
avatar for Howard Rosing

Howard Rosing

Executive Director, DePaul University - Steans Center
Howard Rosing is the Executive Director of the Steans Center at DePaul University. He is a faculty member in Community Service Studies and affiliate faculty member in Geography, Sustainable Urban Development (MASUD) and Community Psychology and co-directs MASUD. Dr. Rosing is a cultural... Read More →
avatar for Phyllis Lovito

Phyllis Lovito

Academic Services Specialist, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Department of Family and Community Health
avatar for Bart Everts

Bart Everts

Librarian, Rutgers University-Camden
MW

Maria Walker

Project Director, Drexel University Action for Early Learning
For more than 15 years, Maria Walker has worked in a variety of capacities to improve the lives of Philadelphians. Currently Project Director for Drexel University’s Office of University and Community Partnerships, Walker has coordinated several programs to improve educational outcomes... Read More →
CR

Colleen Reardon

Director, Strategic Sourcing & Sustainability, University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Barbara B. Priestap

Barbara B. Priestap

GO College (College Access Program) Director, Gannon University
Barbara Priestap, M.Ed., is the director of the GO College program which operates all day, every day in three inner-city schools in Erie, PA. She has served on the faculty at Gannon University and Northwest PA Collegiate Academy. GO College is in its 10th year of serving approx. 550... Read More →
avatar for Ryan Drysdale

Ryan Drysdale

Assistant Director, Campus Partnerships, ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge
Is your campus interested in receiving support, coaching, and resources to institutionalize democratic engagement on campus while being able to earn national recognition? Chat with me about how your campus can join more than 500 institutions in the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challen... Read More →



Tuesday October 22, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am
Commonwealth Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:00am

Poster Session Gallery Open
Posters will be available to view during this time in the Millennium and Commonwealth Foyers

Tuesday October 22, 2019 8:00am - 1:45pm
Commonwealth Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:00am

Plenary: Academic Leadership and the Urban Mission
The urban mission is defined as a university's social and moral responsibility or obligation to serve their community in teaching, research, and service. Pedro Ramos, President and CEO of the Philadelphia Foundation, will moderate a conversation between provosts from four local member institutions about the links between institutional and urban missions. Bill Howard, Vice President and Senior Consultant for Academic Search, will provide introductory remarks

Moderators
PR

Pedro Ramos

President and CEO, The Philadelphia Foundation

Speakers
avatar for Bill Howard

Bill Howard

Vice President and Senior Consultant, Academic Search, Inc.
Www.linkedin.com/in/williamfhoward1/
MP

Michael Palis

Provost, Rutgers University-Camden


Tuesday October 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
Millennium Hall 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:15am

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.

Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:15am - 10:30am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Civic Engagement with Community Partners: A Case Study in Creating a Medical Legal Partnership in Camden, New Jersey
This session will explain the creation of the Medical Legal Partnership of Camden. Given the existing need for legal and medical services in Camden and given the role of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers (CCHP), the Addiction Medicine Clinic at Cooper Hospital (AMC), and Rutgers Law (R-Law) as anchor institutions in the Camden community, all of which provide hundreds of hours of free or low cost services to Camden residents, we decided to combine our efforts to provide even better care to the people of Camden. This presentation will discuss the MLP planning stages, the pitfalls along the way, and provide some best practices for ensuring positive outcomes.

CCHP is a premier non-profit organization known around the country for its pioneering work with individuals who have high healthcare utilization. The AMC provides medication assisted treatment to patients dealing with substance use disorders. In conjunction with CCHP, they are currently administering a program to provide wrap-around services to pregnant women who are dependent on opioids. These patients are some of the most complex and frequently represent populations for whom public sympathy is slight. The medical needs of these populations are acute, and the law frequently impacts their lives as patients face evictions, warrants for low-level offenses, custody disputes, and more. Missing from the otherwise comprehensive work these organizations do with patients around a range of healthcare related issues is the ability to address patients’ legal concerns that often can impede a patient’s ability to become healthier.

Speakers
JS

Jeremy Spiegel

Attorney, Medical Legal Partnership/Rutgers Law School
Jeremy Spiegel is the consulting attorney for the Rutgers Law School/Camden Coalition MLP. In this role, Mr. Spiegel provides legal services to low-income Camden-area patients with complex health conditions. In addition, Mr. Spiegel shapes the MLP’s advocacy agenda in response... Read More →
avatar for Carol Wallinger

Carol Wallinger

Clinical Professor, Rutgers Law School
Carol Wallinger is speaking in a Best Practices session about Civic Engagement and creating a Medical Legal Partnership in Camden, New Jersey. Carol is a clinical professor at both Rutgers Law School and Rutgers School of Nursing Camden, and an adjunct professor at Cooper Medical... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Innovating for Equity: Strategies for Equitable Economic Development
In less than four years, StartUP FIU became Florida International University’s (FIU) platform for entrepreneurship, innovation and inclusion. This session will touch on important contexts that informed why we chose to be so different than most university incubators and economic development offices and of course, how we do what we do! For us, there were three major factors: 1) that the current technological revolution was changing everything, 2) that humans really hate change, and 3) that though everyone was focused on the next big company, we weren’t really sure how that was going to lift up the 20% of Miamians who lived in poverty, let alone the 50% who were one emergency away from homelessness, that informed our work. With the help of strategic philanthropy, an incredible team and design thinking, we were able to convince our leaders to let us take some risks. We will demonstrate how our three lines of business allows us to support faculty commercialization and student startups; serve as the innovation arm of the university by testing our new courses and co-curricular activities; and support equitable economic development through a series of grant-funded programs. Come learn the strategies and techniques we used to create real income stability for our food entrepreneurs, develop more equitable procurement practices for our local suppliers and help our students, faculty and community start and scale new technology companies.

Speakers
EG

Emily Gresham

Assistant Vice President, Florida International University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Overlooked Anchors: Advancing a New Standard of Practice for Arts and Culture Organizations to Create Equitable Opportunity in America’s Cities
Arts and culture organizations continue to expand access to a broader audience through community engagement, to prioritize diversity and inclusion, and to embrace Creative Placemaking. However, the formal anchor framework that was developed to guide community development efforts of other types of organizations (e.g., hospitals, universities and corporations), has not been brought forward to arts and culture organizations. The intentionality and defined strategies of the anchor framework to community revitalization is new to the arts world. The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) and Kresge Foundation's Arts & Culture team, have recently completed a deep dive into the current state of anchor activity among arts and culture organizations. Kresge and ICIC have identified a number of large arts and culture organizations leaning into the anchor framework that indicates engagement pathways for different types of arts and culture organizations, including colleges of art and design. Together with the Kresge Foundation, ICIC will share insights from the report, the paths that colleges of art and design are taking towards anchor engagement, and examples of how existing anchor collaboratives, spearheaded by colleges and universities, have incorporated arts and culture organizations as anchor partners.

Speakers
KZ

Kim Zeuli

Senior Fellow, ICIC
SB

Seth Beattie

Program Officer, The Kresge Foundation


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Examining Mutual Benefit and Reciprocity as Core Distinctions Between Community Engagement and Public Service: Implications for Scholars, Practitioners, and Administrators
Scholar-administrators create new research and use information to help direct their administrative practice. This session will ignite a dialogue among scholars, practitioners, and administrators about the role that community partners play in community-engaged partnerships compared to public service through the lens of mutual benefit and reciprocity. We present original research done using a new data collection system across multiple institutions that captures significant information about community engagement and public service, including the role that partners play in the partnership process. After sharing the initial findings, we will foster a conversation about how we measure mutuality and reciprocity and what that looks like when operationalized through community engagement and public service. The session has implications for the field, practitioners, administrators, and scholars - what happens when we truly understand the role(s) that partners play in advancing common goals? How do we foster change in our communities and institutions when we examine mutuality and reciprocity in this way?

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Norris

Kristin Norris

Director of Assessment, IUPUI Office of Community Engagement
Tracking, monitoring, evaluating, and assessing community engaged activities (e.g., community engaged research, teaching & learning, talent development, pipeline programs, outreach programs, events, technical training and assistance, student engagement) in order to tell a more robust... Read More →
avatar for Kristin Medlin

Kristin Medlin

Director of Research, TreeTop Commons
I am the Director of Research at TreeTop Commons, LLC, where I oversee emerging research efforts to support, promote, and enhance the field of study related to community engagement and socially effective impact across all sectors. I am a co-designer of the Collaboratory (with Janke... Read More →



Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Jefferson 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

The Urban Mission: Around the Globe in One Hour
The future of urban and metropolitan universities is intimately linked with the dynamism of our increasingly complex and interconnected world. Higher education institutions attract individuals from diverse backgrounds and cultures who contribute to rich learning environments, engage in the development and exchange of ideas, and impact communities near and distant. As social institutions, they also serve as forums for dialogue and debate, and platforms for the translation of knowledge and values into action both locally and potentially on a global scale. This Community Conversation will explore how higher education across the globe - particularly as seen through the lens of an urban mission - is shaping and being shaped by social, economic, political and demographic change. Through case studies and rich conversation, we will learn how the urban mission is expressed in different regions and consider how culture, language, history and geography impact the focus and approaches to this work. We will identify challenges and effective strategies that institutions have discovered, and discuss how they extend their reach and scope developing and participating in global partnerships that stimulate their engagement in social and economic development.

Speakers
avatar for Valerie Holton

Valerie Holton

Editor, Metropolitan University journal, National Yang-Ming University
Dr. Holton is an active scholar and teacher, a licensed clinical social worker and a professional consultant to universities and organizations. Valerie serves as editor of CUMU's Metropolitan Universities journal (MUJ), a quarterly, peer-reviewed outlet for scholarship on cutting-edge issues in higher education. In 2018 she was a Senior Fulbright Scholar in the Department of Social Work at National Taiwan University. There she taught an interdisciplinary graduate course on community-engaged... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

A Safe Bet: Leading Change as an Anchor Institution in Atlantic City
In April 2016, New Jersey designated Stockton University as an Anchor Institution. Just over a year later, the university broke ground on a new $176 million residential branch campus on Atlantic City's famous boardwalk. This was an important step for a city looking to reconstitute itself after an economic downturn saw five casinos close and 11,000 jobs lost since 2014. It was also transformational for a university approaching its 50th anniversary that had grown from a liberal arts college of 1,000 students on 1,800 acres in south Jersey's Pinelands Reserve, to a regional comprehensive university of nearly 10,000 students and a growing urban presence. This session outlines the successes and emerging opportunities of Stockton University Atlantic City as we complete our first academic year. Special attention is given to key initiatives within the community, contributions to local redevelopment, coordination with local partners, and efforts to build civic mindedness into the campus curriculum. Collectively, this work demonstrates how Stockton is using the threads of its past to reaffirm its commitment to Atlantic City and region for the future. Participants will have the opportunity to share their own experiences, strategies, and opportunities for leading change in their communities.

Speakers
avatar for Brian K. Jackson

Brian K. Jackson

Chief Operating Officer, Atlantic City Campus, Stockton University
Brian K. Jackson serves as Chief Operating Officer for Stockton University Atlantic City. Most recently, he served as Chief of Staff to the President and Assistant Secretary to the Stockton Board of Trustees for eighteen years. An active and passionate volunteer, Brian serves on... Read More →
avatar for Haley Baum

Haley Baum

Asst. Dean of Students, Stockton University
avatar for Michelle McDonald

Michelle McDonald

Chief Academic Officer, Atlantic City, Stockton University
Michelle Craig McDonald is the Chief Officer for Academic Programming, Atlantic City and Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs at Stockton University. In this capacity, she coordinates Stockton’s off-campus instructional sites, including the university's new Atlantic City... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Engaged and Empowered Collaborations: Creating Authentic and Inclusive Spaces of Dialogue
When exploring issues of diversity and inclusion in higher education and specifically in public engagement, it is important to consider creating inclusive spaces of dialogue. Based on the University of Michigan’s intergroup dialogue model, this workshop will explore strategies to enhance authentic and inclusive dialogues among collaborative partnerships. Particular attention will be paid to understanding concepts of privileged and targeted identities and how this impacts collaborations. This workshop will advocate moving from the “cult of the expert” model to a model that honors many voices and perspectives. It is through dialogue that diverse perspectives and voices can be heard. Dialogue creates a space for this form of empowered collaboration. Participants will engage in activities such as the social identity wheel as well as gain valuable strategies for creating empowered collaborations through dialogue.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Nieto

Nicole Nieto

Assistant Vice Provost, The Ohio State University
I have a deep passion for equity and social justice. I work to build positive relationships among diverse communities. I am interested in immigration and gender equity. I believe food traditions can bring communities together. I believe we can learn powerful lessons from the Civil... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

Reimagining Community Re-Development: Beyond Gentrification?
The purpose of this panel is to gather a diverse cross-section of university and community-based stakeholders engaged and/or impacted by the surging redevelopment in Milwaukee’s core to participate in a frank discussion of the city’s redevelopment efforts and gentrification. Additionally, we examine how (re)investment is being reimagined by non-profits, grassroots efforts, and university stakeholders. Specifically, the panel seeks to examine if community (re)development and (re)investment can be undertaken in such a way that historically marginalized populations do not undergo further marginalization, and if so, how?

Like many cities around the United States, Milwaukee is experiencing rapid redevelopment in its urban core. While such urban renewal is bringing resources to segments of the city that have suffered several generations of disinvestment, in many instances the long-standing residents of these areas, who are overwhelmingly African-American and Latinx are not reaping the benefits of this real estate development resurgence. To the contrary, significant portions of long-standing residents of color are witnessing the cultural fabric of their neighborhoods erode as developers cater to white middle-class taste and sensibilities. A demographic that often maintains little to no cultural and historical understanding of the neighborhoods they are helping to gentrify. Other long-standing residents of color are experiencing displacement as they find themselves priced out of their neighborhood due to the rising property taxes that typically accompany gentrification. Given gentrification’s global reach, the insights ascertained through this panel hold import well beyond Milwaukee’s city limits.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Smith

Angela Smith

Owner & Operator, The Zen Dragonfly LLC
I love talking about cultures from all over the world. It opens doors of understanding and realization we are very much alike. We want our communities to be well and have access. That people want to create space of their own and it's nothing wrong with it. I love holistic healing... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Thomas

Kevin Thomas

Assistant Professor of Multicultural Branding, Marquette University
@Kevin Thomas, Ph.D. (Milwaukee, WI) is an Assistant Professor of Multicultural Branding at Marquette University. Dr. Thomas investigates the socio-cultural impact of marketing communication and consumer behavior. His primary research interest pertains to understanding the relationship... Read More →
avatar for Naya Jones

Naya Jones

Postdoctoral Fellow, Medical College of Wisconsin
As a geographer and healing arts practitioner, I partner with people of color and indigenous-led and -centered organizations on research + practice related to food sovereignty, racial trauma, and traditional and community healing ways.
TW

Tyler Weber

Community Partner, Community Partner


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Commonwealth A2 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

This is Not Another Thing on the Plate; This IS the Plate: Institutionalizing Anchor Work In Uncertain Times
The anchor mission reinforces the roots of our public mission as contributors to the civic and economic prosperity of our urban regions. It has also re-organized our institutions internally. Anchor work can become more complicated at a time when there is limited capacity; especially during succession and staff turnover. While many of our colleagues and leaders are committed to the intentionality and data-driven approach of the anchor mission, it’s not always easy to secure buy-in from key stakeholders across the institution. The urban mission of higher ed. is easily siloed. However, we believe that anchor work is not another thing on the plate; it is the plate. This facilitated dialogue will capture stories from the faculty and administration of private and public urban institutions, responsible with advancing anchor, regardless of the political and fiscal environment of the moment. This session will begin with brief opening statements from representatives from Buffalo State/SUNY, the College of Staten Island/CUNY, Rutgers – Newark, St. John’s University/Staten Island Campus, and Wagner College, on their efforts to integrate anchor. The panelists represent institutions that are both a part of, and external to CUMU and TDC’s Anchor Learning Network. A set of guided questions and a moderated panel discussion will follow.

Specific topic areas for institutionalizing anchor include:

  • Connection to strategic planning and priorities 
  • Leveraging cross-sectoral alliances for cross-campus alliances
  • Inventorying assets and research opportunities
  • Leveraging regional partnerships and local expertise
  • Creating organizational structures and incentivizing activity
  • Defining the value proposition

Speakers
avatar for Arlette Cepeda

Arlette Cepeda

Director of CLCE, Wagner College
Arlette Cepeda is a civic professional and a visual artist. Cepeda is the director of the Center for Leadership and Community Engagement (CLCE) at Wagner College. She oversees student programs and initiatives focused on community engagement such as the Bonner Leaders Program, the... Read More →
avatar for Ken Iwama

Ken Iwama

Vice President, CUNY/College of Staten Island
As the Vice President of Economic Development, Continuing Studies and Government Relations, I support and enhance economic growth and sustainability through higher education opportunity, human capital and talent development, applied research and innovation, entrepreneurship and business... Read More →
avatar for Crystal Montalvo

Crystal Montalvo

Director Community Educational Engagement, College of Staten Island/CUNY
Crystal Vera-Montalvo joined the College of Staten Island/CUNY in July 2018 as the Director of Community Educational Engagement. As a key convener of the College's anchor mission, Crystal manages community-based partnerships, and oversees nationally recognized pre-college programs... Read More →
avatar for Peter Englot

Peter Englot

Sr. Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs, Rutgers University Newark
As Senior Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs and Chief of Staff at Rutgers University – Newark (RU-N), Peter Englot leads the university’s communications efforts and supports Chancellor Nancy Cantor and her leadership team in coordination of activities across their divisions... Read More →
avatar for Alan Delmerico

Alan Delmerico

Community Health Behavior Scientist, Center for Health and Social Research
Dr. Alan Delmerico is a Community Health Behavior Scientist at the Institute for Community Health Promotion, Center for Health and Social Research. He received a BA/MA in Economics, an MA in Geography, and a PhD in Geography from the University at Buffalo, the State University of... Read More →
RF

Robert Fanuzzi

Associate Provost, Civic Engagement, St. John's University Staten Island Campus


Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:30am

President’s Roundtable (Invite Only)
Attendance to this event is by invitation only. This working session allows in-depth discussions between member presidents and chancellors and experts on best practices related to the unique opportunities and challenges facing our institutions.

Tuesday October 22, 2019 10:30am - 12:30pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Anchors Making an Impact: How to Create and Communicate an Economic Impact Report that Stands Out
Penn’s recent Economic Impact Report is a studied internationally by higher education for its successful synthesis of complex statistics into a compelling presentation at the core of Penn’s advocacy and public relations strategy presentation of a complex narrative that has become a significant aspects of Penn’s anchor institution advocacy and communications plan.

Speakers
TS

Tony Sorrentino

Assistant Vice President, University of Pennsylvania


Tuesday October 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Civic U© and Civic High©: A Model of University-Designed Civic Education for the Community
In 2015, the Pat Brown Institute at Cal State LA joined with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to create a civic education program for the Los Angeles community. Civic U© is organized and developed as a substantive and accessible guide to the power points of Los Angeles government. Under the direction of PBI Executive Director, Dr. Raphael Sonenshein, a noted expert on Los Angeles government, Civic U© has developed a strong constituency: community organizations, neighborhood councils, private foundations, and even within the city government itself. It has now been incorporated into the city budget as an annual training provided to LA neighborhood council leaders. The program has received grant support from private foundations. Civic U© has now expanded to education regarding Los Angeles county government, the Los Angeles school district, and the council-manager form of government prevalent in the county areas outside the city of Los Angeles. Participants report a much increased sense of efficacy in their dealings with local government and a greater optimism that they can make a difference. In the last year, PBI has incorporated a high school version known as Civic High©, which has worked with high school students in our service area, including training them to run full-scale actual candidate debates for major offices. The presentation will include a brief history of the Civic U© and Civic High© and excerpts from the training, allowing for interaction with the audience. Civic U was presented as a poster session at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Speakers
avatar for Raphael Sonenshein

Raphael Sonenshein

Executive Director, Pat Brown Institute


Tuesday October 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Responsible Redevelopment - East Baltimore Development Initiative
In 2002, the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore approved plans to create a new $1.8 billion mixed-use, mixed-income community in East Baltimore that required the acquisition by eminent domain of 2,000 properties and relocation of nearly 750 families from the Middle East neighborhood. Massive deindustrialization, the riots of 1968, white and black flight, the scourge of drug addiction, gangs and crime rate double the city’s average gave rise to the extreme intervention of buying properties and relocating hundreds of families. Today, the project is about 40 percent completed with 800 homes and apartments, 685,000 square feet of office and lab space, 40,000 square feet of retail, a central park, neighborhood school, and a hotel.

The large-scale use of relocation and demolition required a new approach to redevelopment. The story of responsible redevelopment is pioneering and unique to EBDI and started with elected and government officials, philanthropy and institutions. From its inception, the framers of EBDI adopted community engagement, equity and economic inclusion guiding principles. This approach combines economic, community and human development strategies in ways that seek to ensure maximum benefit from the revitalization efforts for area residents. Today, the Middle East neighborhoods, now called Eager Park, is Baltimore’s most integrated neighborhood racially, economically and intergenerationally.

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Washington

Cheryl Washington

President - CEO, East Baltimore Development Inc
Cheryl Washington is the President and Chief Executive Officer of East Baltimore Development, Inc. (EBDI), which is the non-profit 501(c)(3) organization charged with overseeing the $1.8 billion revitalization of an 88-acre portion of East Baltimore adjacent to Johns Hopkins medical... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Frank

Andrew Frank

Consultant, East Baltimore Development Inc


Tuesday October 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:30am

Metropolitan Universities Journal Idea Exchange
Have ideas about future issues of Metropolitan Universities, CUMU’s quarterly online journal? Have thoughts about its direction and scope? We want to hear from you.

Join Editor Valerie Holton for lunch. This open dialogue session is the perfect time to
  • Meet guest editors and members of the editorial board
  • Learn about publication opportunities
  • Share your ideas about issue topics
  • Learn about serving as a guest editor
  • Understand our editorial process
  • Provide general feedback

Speakers
avatar for Valerie Holton

Valerie Holton

Editor, Metropolitan University journal, National Yang-Ming University
Dr. Holton is an active scholar and teacher, a licensed clinical social worker and a professional consultant to universities and organizations. Valerie serves as editor of CUMU's Metropolitan Universities journal (MUJ), a quarterly, peer-reviewed outlet for scholarship on cutting-edge issues in higher education. In 2018 she was a Senior Fulbright Scholar in the Department of Social Work at National Taiwan University. There she taught an interdisciplinary graduate course on community-engaged... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:30am

Lunch Buffet
Lunch in Commonwealth A, B, and C

Tuesday October 22, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Building Bridges, Not Walls: Promoting Democracy and Diversity Through Multicultural Community Collaboration
“How can we be civically engaged every day?”

This query, posed by the Greater Portland Immigrant Welcome Center’s Executive Director, stewards the aspirations of the interdisciplinary community-engagement project, Democracy and Diversity, conducted by the University of Southern Maine, in collaboration with several local community partners.  As ideological tensions mount to the point of crisis, the role of contextually and culturally aware community-engagement becomes increasingly vital and restorative. In Maine, like many Northern states experiencing a “demographic winter,” community-university collaborations provide a sustainable way forward in ameliorating tensions and building cross-polarity alliances.

Our workshop will discuss the first stages of the Democracy and Diversity project, contextualized in the social and cultural history of Maine and USM. We will scaffold our presentation with core questions to guide participants' own consideration of possible projects, as well as ground in sociological theory and community engagement scholarship and best practices. Design of,and prelimlinary results from, a sruvey used with our classes to assess the particular impact of this community engagement on diverse students and the differential potential for perseverence,student success and civic engagement will also be explored. 



Speakers
avatar for Michelle Vazquez Jacobus

Michelle Vazquez Jacobus

Associate Professor, University of Southern Maine
Michelle Vazquez Jacobus, J.D., M.S.W. works from backgrounds in both social work and law in focusing her work on community-engaged learning and community capacity building, particularly through promoting diversity and multiculturalism. Michelle has co-authored several articles exploring... Read More →
RB

Robert Baskett

Psychologist/Clinical Researcher, Sandcastle Clinical and Educational Services
Robert Baskett is a clinical psychologist working with children at an inclusive early education center, Sandcastle Clinical and Educational Services in Lewiston, Maine. While unaccustomed to speaking about himself in the third person, Dr. Baskett’s previous experience in community... Read More →
avatar for David Everson

David Everson

Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Southern Maine
David W. Everson (PhD-Notre Dame, '17) is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern Maine. His community-based teaching and scholarship focus on Indigenous peoples' sovereignty and social movements. He is a Research Fellow with the Center for American Indian... Read More →



Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:00pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Community Engagement Database: A Comprehensive Inventory of Georgetown's Engagements in DC
The Database details Georgetown University’s community engagements and partnerships in Washington, DC. It includes service and volunteer projects, research targeted to our local communities, direct support to organizations, and public programming. Our goal is to create a coherent and transparent picture for both internal and external partners. We aim to facilitate strong reciprocal partnerships with organizations focused on community development and social change in the following areas: health (access and equity), environment, economic justice, arts and education. The Community Engagement Database reflects Georgetown’s unique integration of teaching, research, and service as “contemplatives in action” pursuing social justice.

Our hope is for faculty and staff to use the database to identify existing community engagements and partners to leverage (or avoid duplication) in order to advance community-based learning, other projects, and research, enhancing overall community impact. To that end, it will be used to identify Georgetown faculty and staff for potential collaboration on community-based learning and other projects. The database will help faculty and staff identify trends (and gaps) in existing engagements by issue area, geography, population served, project funder, Georgetown division, and other dimensions that can be leveraged to obtain additional funding by current or new funders. Lastly, the database (and ideally the map) will enable us to present a comprehensive picture of Georgetown’s extensive community engagement work that can be shared with many audiences including students and prospective students, faculty, staff, community members, city leaders, funders, and others in the higher education community.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Murphy

Christopher Murphy

Vice President for Govt Relations and Community Engagement, Georgetown University
Christopher Murphy serves as Vice President of Government Relations and Community Engagement at Georgetown University where he manages the university’s strategic relationships with the Federal and District governments, community organizations and leaders, and the Georgetown neighborhood... Read More →



Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:00pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Community Service. Who's Serving Whom?
Myself & my partner Mr Juan Carter would tagteam for a 60 minute session on the importance of serving your community and community engagement. This will be done a mini breakout sessions with reverse role-playing. We will talk about best practices used in the city of Providence in the state of Rhode Island where we both work and community engagement Mr. Carter with the non-violence Institute as a director of the street worker program and myself as a CEO and founder of my own nonprofit A Sweet Creation Youth Organization. We have travel throughout New England and beyond both as co-advisers of the NAACP youth and college chapters in Providence Rhode Island and myself as the new England area conference advisor for the NAACP youth and college encouraging and empowering our young people in those in their community to serve others work together and break the chains that bind us. Those who participate in will get a brief synopsis of what we both do,some practical practices and scenarios in which they can break out into groups of either 2/4 they will be given a brief outline of the scenario in which they will have to engage with you with each other and present to the whole entire group. These scenarios will be based on different experiences that we’ve had traveling around to other states serving other communities. Those in our group will have constant contact with us if they have any further questions or need any further assistance.

Speakers
avatar for Pilar Mccloud

Pilar Mccloud

CEO, A Sweet Creation Youth Org
avatar for Juan Carter

Juan Carter

President, A Sweet Creation Youth Organization
Juan Carter is born and raised in Providence in a housing complex known as Lockwood Plaza. From the late 80s to the early 2000s, the neighborhood was known for drug dealing and street violence. Growing up in a two parent household with an older sister; there were lots of positive... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:00pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Collaboration and Design to Nourish Our Community
What happens when students, faculty, and community engage together to address the food concerns of local neighbors? Learn how university-neighborhood-nonprofit collaboration has been designed to strengthen neighbors, create relationships, and build communities that thrive together. In the 2019 spring semester, students, faculty and community leaders worked to create a design concept for a “Little Library” with a green twist: provide gardeners a way to share their surplus with others in need. Just a few miles down the road and across the highway, another group of students, faculty and neighbors worked together to develop community nutrition classes, while back on campus a group of students worked with a local nonprofit to provide access to a community-supported agriculture model of produce distribution. Each of these initiatives has roots in the idea that our students and our community are one and the same, with much to learn from one another. This is not only because MSU Denver is a non-residential commuter campus that serves local students with an accessible education, but also because important communities of Denver are struggling with the impacts of gentrification that are also affecting our faculty, staff and students with escalating rents and challenging living environments.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Parmelee

Elizabeth Parmelee

Assoc. VP of Undergraduate Studies, MSU Denver
I oversee and collaborate with undergraduate academic programs including the Applied Learning Center, Honors, the Individualized Degree Program, International Studies, the Writing Center and Advising System. I am also charged with advancing civic engagement and the American Democracy... Read More →
RS

Rachel Sinley

Assistant Professor, MSU Denver


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Jefferson 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Support or Stifle?: The Institutional Role in Student Civic Engagement
A major part of the anchor institution mission is to educate and involve students in experiences in which students engage with communities beyond the campus through direct service, community-based academic experiences, and other projects. The University often facilitates these experiences for students in order to ensure that the best interests of all stakeholders—including students, faculty, community members, community partners, and the University itself—are represented and nurtured. With the University as both a facilitator and a stakeholder, however, administering community engagement experiences can lead to difficulties, especially considering University administrative priorities and procedures, including risk management, student safety and satisfaction, legal policies, government and community relations policies, etc.

In this Community Conversation, representatives from the University Community Partnerships team at Drexel University, who facilitate community engagement experiences for thousands of Drexel students each year, will lead a dialogue to create mutual understanding and best practices around maximizing student experiences in the community while minimizing institutional limitations and barriers that can often constrain the potential creative, educational, and social impact of these experiences. The goal of the conversation is to identify connections/consensus around the ideal goals of civic engagement experiences for students, what benefits and downsides exist when Universities assume responsibility for facilitating these experiences, and how we as practitioners can help students find/create authentic engagement experiences while acknowledging the reality of the Institution’s administrative framework.

Speakers
avatar for Cara Scharf

Cara Scharf

Assistant Director, Community-Based Learning, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement
CH

Carrie Hutnick

Associate Director, Community-Based Learning, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement
KT

Katharine Travaline

Associate Director, Programs & Special Projects, Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: Fostering Engaged Leaders Through Student Financial Aid Advocacy Days
For over 30 years, NYU has been bringing students to our state capitol and Washington DC to advocate for financial aid programs that they are a part of. During these annual trips, participants have a unique opportunity to meet Members of Congress and State Lawmakers, and their staff, face-to-face, voicing their opinions on federal and state student financial assistance programs, while learning about the intricacies of the political atmosphere of Capitol Hill and Albany, NY. Approximately 90 students travel to Albany and 30 students to DC each year in a trip organized by the University's Government Affairs Office. The past two years have seen an uptick in registration and interest for these trips as students are reigniting their civic and political engagement. This lightening session will talk about how we recruit for these trips and coordinate our advocacy message, and share a bit about the experience and leadership students gain from participating in these trips.

Speakers
CE

Chris Echeverria

Assistant Director, New York University
Chris Echeverria is an Assistant Director at NYU's Government Affairs department Chris manages city relations for NYU by lobbying on policy issues relevant to the institution, building relationships with government officials, and representing the university to the policy communit... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: How Campuses Can Graduate Students into Voters
Colleges and universities are leaders in cultivating generations of informed, engaged community members needed for democracy to thrive. They are designed to educate and develop citizens. With nearly 20 million college students in the United States, institutions of higher education have a responsibility to help their students overcome the structural and psychological obstacles that new voters often face. And they can instill the importance of democratic participation, which can inspire lifelong participation in our democracy.

Recognizing the importance of getting college students more engaged in our democratic processes, the Students Learn Students Vote (SLSV) Coalition was founded in February 2016 to design and advance a shared agenda around student voting and political learning in higher education. Comprised of a diverse group of nearly 400 local, state, national, and student nonpartisan organizations working with over 1,600 campuses, the SLSV Coalition is the national hub and the largest nonpartisan network in the U.S. dedicated to increasing political learning and college student voting.

This lightning session will talk about how colleges and universities can work towards graduating students into voters based off of the research Ideas42 conducted about the behavioral and psychological barriers to voting and how their campus can institutionalize civic learning and democratic engagement in their community.

Speakers
KQ

Kathryn Quintin

Partnerships Manager, Young Invincibles


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: Jump STARTing Community Engagement
Purdue University Fort Wayne is recently designated as a metropolitan university and we are endeavoring to increase and reward community engagement. In particular we value such activities that involve students as well as faculty and community partners, and that might lead to the development of lasting relationships. Often such enterprises need some help getting going, and so we in the College of Arts and Sciences established the START program to seed such collaborations. The START program helps faculty partner with local institutions, agencies, and other community groups to develop initiatives that provide significant hands-on learning opportunities for our students, offer measurable benefits to the residents of the Fort Wayne metropolitan region. The START program funds opportunities that support research, development, and community-building projects in which our faculty and students work directly with community members, civic leaders, and regional institutions to accelerate Fort Wayne’s growth and enterprise. Every project will be designed to help improve the quality of life for our communities, enhance the learning opportunities and experiences for students, and contribute positively to the visibility and prominence of one of American’s great and growing cities. After introducing the structure and intent of the START program, I will take a deeper look into examples of selected START projects, describing the benefits to the involved faculty, students and community collaborators, highlighting successes and challenges, giving attendees ideas about how they might initiate similar endeavors. I will also discuss our successes at getting the program to be more self-supporting.

Speakers
BK

Bruce Kingsbury

Associate Dean, Purdue University Fort Wayne
I am Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Purdue University Fort Wayne, professor of Biology, and director of the Environmental Resources Center (ERC). The mission of the ERC is to promote the understanding and conservation of natural resources in the region. As associate... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: Preparing Students to be Informed and Engaged Citizens: The American Democracy Project
American Democracy Project (ADP) is a network of more than 250 state colleges and universities focused on public higher education’s role in preparing the next generation of informed, engaged citizens for our democracy.
This Lightning Session will discuss the various national and local initiatives and strategies from digital polarization and college-community engagement and deliberative dialogues to voter education and engagement, and share some of the results of the work to equip students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and experiences they need to be informed, engaged members of their communities.

ADP was established in 2003 as a nonpartisan initiative of AASCU in partnership with The New York Times and member institutions serve 2.5 million students in 46 states.

Speakers
AK

Anna Keegan

Program Manager - American Democracy Project, American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU)


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement: Building Social Infrastructure
Simon Fraser University's Vancity Office of Community Engagement was initiated in December 2019 within the School for Contemporary Arts in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver as part of the Woodward's redevelopment. The Office has also recently opened a satellite office at a former police station within the neighbourhood. With a focus on programming and partnerships in the three areas of 1) arts, culture and community 2) Social and Environmental Justice and 3) Urban Issues, this presentation will discuss some of the successes and challenges during the start-up period of this office both within the institution and in the community.

Speakers
avatar for Am Johal

Am Johal

Director, SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: Turning to Each Other: An Introduction and Critical Discussion on Community Learning Exchange
In the spirit of calling attention to the innovative ways educators and community leaders can address racial, social, political, and environmental unrest, we turn our attention to the methodology of Community Learning Exchanges (CLEs). The CLE explores and utilizes the skills, assets, and expertise of the local communities, and invites them into critical conversations with community leaders and other key stakeholders. Since 2008, the CLE has been convening diverse individuals from across the country to engage in collective, place-based learning experiences that stimulate inquiry, dialogue, and action (Guajardo, Guajardo, Janson & Militello, 2016).

The work of the CLE is guided by the philosophy that transformational and powerful change occurs by uniting the power of place and the wisdom of people. This philosophy is enacted by the CLE theory of change, which invites participants to look at our families, our neighborhoods, our communities, and our organizations with an eye for relationships, assets, stories, place, politic, and action (RASPPA). The RASPPA theory of change creates the cognitive, affective, and relational space in which CLE participants can begin to come together and share their collective gifts. This generative process allows for understanding of collective challenges from multiple perspectives and then opportunities to co-construct solutions to those challenges that, when enacted together, can lead to sustained and empowering action and change.

Speakers
SB

Sascha Betts

Graduate Student, Texas State University
MG

Miguel Guajardo

professor, Texas State University
OH

Orlando Hinojosa

Graduate Student, Texas State University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Lightning Session: “Be The: Visionary”: Advertising Students, Civic Engagement and Active Learning
CommUniverCity is a unique partnership between San Jose State University, the City of San Jose and the Community within a two mile radius of campus in Downtown San Jose. The advertising program at SJSU has collaborated with CommUniverCity since 2013 and this latest one arose from an identified need by San Jose City Council’s Human Resources department. Their need was to attract upcoming and recent graduates who would otherwise be drawn to careers in the tech industries to careers in civic service. The advertising task was to produce an advertising campaign raising awareness about the possibilities of a civic service career.

Designing a curriculum that prepares students for careers in the advertising industry yet enables them to retain an ethically balanced world view is a challenging task. Required skills need to be embedded within an overarching active learning framework that enables students to develop their advertising craft skills. They need to gain hands-on experience of brand communications and also understand that their skills enable them to also promote a not-for-profit agenda. Advertising students developing their craft through active learning scenarios with community based groups, environmental organizations or NGOs can change cultural behavior.

To achieve a positive outcome students, as part of the research and production stages of the campaign process, engaged with the community and existing employees, they produced campaigns that presented the emotional benefits of working for the City through a series of executions that were adopted by and went on to win advertising awards as well.

Speakers
avatar for John Delacruz

John Delacruz

Communications & Creative Director, San Jose State University CommUniverCity
John Delacruz, Associate Professor of Advertising, is responsible for the Creative Track of San Jose State’s Advertising program and developing partnerships between industry and education. He also develops collaborative projects for students nationally and internationally. His research... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Mind Matters: Engaging the University and Community in Well-Being
Historically underserved communities experience a higher prevalence of psychological distress and face obstacles to accessing behavioral health services. Because a majority of students at Cal State LA come from such communities, the university is committed to meet the critical needs of its students—and their communities—through an initiative led by the Cal State LA president. Mind Matters has been in existence for six years and is unique in its scope and reach. All incoming students learn about the initiative during orientation. In addition, more than 700 faculty, staff, and students have been trained in Mental Health First Aid, an eight-hour course designed to help them assist those experiencing psychological problems. Because approximately 65% of our students are the first in their families to attend college, helping parents learn how to support their college students is of paramount importance. Parents are invited to a special orientation and weekend workshops throughout the year. This year Cal State LA offered Mental Health First Aid to parents, in both Spanish and English. The initial offering was met with enthusiasm, particularly among Spanish-speaking parents, as the importance of well-being was a new concept. Because nearly 70% of our students remain in Los Angeles after they graduate, the university is dedicated to developing a culture of care among its students, staff, faculty, and the surrounding community. Participants will learn how to develop a comprehensive initiative that includes parents and students to help create a culture of well-being in their universities and the communities they serve.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Wada-McKee

Nancy Wada-McKee

Vice President for Student Life, California State University, Los Angeles
avatar for Robert Lopez

Robert Lopez

Executive Director for Communication, California State University Los Angeles
Robert Lopez is the executive director for communications and public affairs at Cal State LA. His office oversees media relations, public affairs, social media, website design, university branding and messaging for the president and senior leadership. Prior to that, he was an adjunct... Read More →
avatar for William A. Covino

William A. Covino

President, California State University, Los Angeles


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Anchors, Growth and Equity
“Eds and meds” anchors in the city of Philadelphia are coordinating efforts to aggregate local procurement in order to generate substantial local economic benefit. This workshop will be a panel focused on discussing the concept/strategy of local anchor institutions working together to increase purchasing to help grow local businesses, strengthen the economy, create jobs, and build wealth. The panel will break down the challenges Universities, Hospitals and inclusion advocacy groups have when driving purchasing and hiring initiatives. Institutions will also share their procurement success stories as they relate to local spend and hiring. A local advocacy group, The Economy League, will discuss their journey on coordinating a collaborative, the challenges of gathering data from multiple organizations and dealing with decision makers to achieve intuitional buy in.

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Britton

Jennifer Britton

Director, Communications & Special Projects, Office of University & Community Partnerships

Speakers
RB

Robert Burkholder

Senior Vice President, Supply Chain Management, Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health
avatar for Mariya Khandros

Mariya Khandros

Director of Shared Solutions, Economy League of Greater Philadelphia
Mariya Khandros is the Director of Shared Solutions at the Economy League. Her primary responsibility is to oversee the development and implementation of Philadelphia Anchors for Growth and Equity, a project focused on increasing local purchasing by Philadelphia’s hospitals, universities... Read More →
avatar for Julie Jones

Julie Jones

Assistant Vice President, Procurement Services
Julie Ann Jones is a Project Management and Procurement Strategist who partners with executives, cross-divisional teams, and external entities to strategically source and manage contractual engagements to the financial and product benefit of her sponsor. Julie has a history of transforming... Read More →
avatar for Mark Mills

Mark Mills

Executive Director and CPO, University of Pennsylvania
As the University of Pennsylvania’s Executive Director of Purchasing Services, Mark oversees approximately $1 billion in University spend. Mark’s team performs a variety of services on behalf of Penn, ranging from strategic sourcing, supplier management, procure-to-pay systems... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Commonwealth A2 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Can a University and Healthcare System Really Lead a Community Anchor-Mission Collaboration? The Weber State University and Intermountain Healthcare Story
Fulfilling an anchor-mission can be accomplished in a variety of ways depending upon the needs of the community. Some anchor institutions are "going it alone" while others are collaborating with partner anchor institutions within the community. Such a partnership has been formed in Ogden, UT with Weber State University and Intermountain Healthcare leading the way. Five additional anchor institutions are part of the Ogden Civic Action Network with the following anchor-mission:

The Ogden Civic Action Network commits to intentionally apply our long-term, place-based economic power, intellectual assets, and human capital in partnership with our community to mutually benefit the long-term well-being of all involved. We also seek an economic system that ensures that equity, inclusion, economic stability and resilience are produced as a natural consequence of the functioning of the economy.

In this session Lisa Nichols, Community Health Associate Vice President with Intermountain Healthcare, Angela Choberka, Community Partnership Specialist with Intermountain Healthcare, and Bill Cook, Executive Director of the Ogden Civic Action Network will participate on a panel moderated by Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski, Associate Provost at Weber State University responsible for high impact programs. They will share what the secret sauce is, share the real results, and describe the grand plan.

With all of our anchor institutions bringing resources to the table and committing to the anchor-mission we expect significant impacts for our community. We will be removing barriers and creating opportunities that will impact the lives of individuals and families for generations to come.

Speakers
BC

Bill Cook

Executive Director, Ogden Civic Action Network, Weber State University
As the Executive Director for the Office of Community Development, Bill is leading the Ogden Civic Action Network initiative. The focus of the Network is to address the 30% poverty that exists in the East Central Neighborhood of Ogden. Even more challenging is the fact that 70... Read More →
avatar for Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski

Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski

Associate Provost, Weber State University
avatar for Angela Choberka

Angela Choberka

Community Partnership Specialist, Intermountain Healthcare


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Leadership & Succession: Where Will the Next Generation of Leaders Come From? Presidential Partners
The panel of presenters will discuss the lessons learned in addressing and solving the challenges of university and K-12 leadership succession as civic engagement partnerships were evolving and growing. Each presenter has personal experience with developing strong civic engagement partnerships as well as the inevitable challenges associated with transitions to new leadership. The panel will share insights and strategies into how to prepare universities and partners for the challenges when leaders change.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Gannon

Tim Gannon

Principle, Port Richmond High School
Tim was principal of Port Richmond HS on Staten Island for 12 1/2 years from 2005 to 2017. In that time he partnered with Wagner College President Dr. Richard Guarasci to establish the Wagner College Port Richmond Partnership as well as the Port Richmond Partnership Leadership Academy... Read More →
avatar for Nyeema Watson

Nyeema Watson

Associate Chancellor for Civic Engagement, Rutgers University—Camden
RG

Richard Guarasci

President Emeritus, Presidential Partners LLC


Tuesday October 22, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:00pm

Economic Inclusion on Design and Construction Projects at the University of Pennsylvania, an Urban Campus in Philadelphia
Penn has engaged with the design, construction, and local communities through a multitude of economic inclusion efforts for the past 25+ years. Activities have included: early project reviews with City representatives; design and construction participation goals listed in requests for proposals and contracts and used as evaluation factors; reviewing bid lists and bid opportunities in advance; pre-bid project notification meetings with diversity vendors; third-party tracking and reporting of contracted and workforce participation; a consistent and engaging bi-monthly forum for challenging construction contractors to maximize diversity contracting and workforce opportunities and performance against goals meeting with contractors and trade unions when projects are not achieving goals; apprenticeship programs that build increase workforce diversity; involvement in programs that encourage high school interest in architecture, engineering and construction; and workshops that help construction related businesses entering the already established construction culture. Come hear about the programs that Penn has established and the challenges we have overcome and those that we still face.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Dausch

Michael Dausch

Executive Director, Design and Construction, University of Pennsylvania
Michael holds a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Clemson University, and an M.B.A. from The Johns Hopkins University. His professional experience includes over 25 years of design and construction management, starting as a Mechanical Engineer for the State of Maryland... Read More →
GB

Glenn Bryan

Assistant Vice President of Community Relations, University of Pennsylvania


Tuesday October 22, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:00pm

Engaged Civic Learning: Just Compensation for Community Expertise
Providing honoraria for guest speakers is common practice across higher education. Rather than simply a fee for service, these gifts uphold an idealistic vision–a valuing of the knowledge that invited lecturers offer, a contribution to the ongoing project of collective understanding. Similarly, pedagogies involving civic engagement seek out the knowledge of diverse community groups. For these groups’ insights, universities tend to reciprocate through in-kind student or faculty service. The institution’s appreciation for the knowledge that local partners share however, much less frequently takes the form of honoraria.

In this session, we will explore the educational contexts in which honoraria can support partner trust and student learning in civic engagement endeavors. We will examine one model for this practice, an undergraduate Urban Studies course we taught at Rutgers University–Camden in Fall, 2018. The course–New Orleans in-Person: Racial Justice, Po’Boys, and Cultural Appropriation–involved a seven-day trip to New Orleans. On the trip, we arranged a series of engagements with local community organizers and coalitions. While some of these groups might have voluntarily met with our class, others–whose past experiences bred skepticism of outsiders–would have refused. Their preconceived attitudes notwithstanding, we sought to legitimize and value the knowledge of each local organization with which we engaged–we provided honoraria. We found that this practice facilitated access, demonstrated respect, and built a foundation for future engagements between university and community. Through this session, we will examine appropriate contexts for community partner honoraria and the potential benefits and complications.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Danley

Stephen Danley

Associate Professor, Rutgers-Camden University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:00pm

Pace University & One Hundred Black Men of New York: Junior 100 Pathways to Success Program Overview and Assessment
In 2014, Pace University was approached by One Hundred Black Men (OHMB) of New York to donate space for their unique and innovative Junior 100 Pathways to Success scholarship program. After learning more about the program, the Office of Government & Community Relations, in partnership with the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, agreed to host with one request, to work collaboratively with OHMB and become their academic partner.

Entering its fourth year at Pace this spring semester, this 16-week youth development program for more than two dozen High School juniors and seniors takes place on Saturdays, January thru May, and includes classes on college readiness, life skills, financial literacy, ballroom dancing and entrepreneurship training with a strong emphasis on the integration of technology in business. The student scholars, all college-bound who will largely be the first in their family to go to college, are accepted into the competitive program after a series of interviews and often have their first college experience on Pace’s New York City campus.

This year, OHBM has agreed to admit up to 10 students who are currently homeless and living in transitional housing throughout New York City. This initiative grew from a conversation between NYC Deputy Mayor Phil Thompson and OHBM President Michael Garner.

This pilot program at Pace has been replicated in other cities across the country within OHBM’s network nationally. This best practice session will give an overview of the program with particular attention paid to the classes Pace teaches.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa J. Herman

Vanessa J. Herman

AVP, Government and Community Relations, Pace University
Since February 2013, Vanessa J. Herman has served as the Assistant Vice President for Government and Community Relations at Pace University. In this role Vanessa oversees the University’s Federal, State and local government relations portfolio and is the primary point of contact... Read More →
DJ

Dr. Jonathan Hill

Dean, Pace Univserity - Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems


Tuesday October 22, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:30pm

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.


Tuesday October 22, 2019 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

1:45pm

Plenary: Increasing Access through Equity: How to Develop an “All-In” Strategy for Higher Education Success
How can a university respond to community desires for increased educational opportunities for its young people, national shifts in student demographics, and the loud calls for increasing college affordability?

When Rutgers University–Camden launched its Office of Civic Engagement a decade ago, community stakeholders were very clear that access to higher education was a top priority. The need was justified: less than half of Camden’s high school seniors graduated and enrolled in college. Rutgers–Camden responded by developing a suite of K12 programs for students in grades four through 12 in Camden that provided out-of-school-time programs focused on college access. However, what also became apparent was that access to higher education for first-generation students both in Camden and across the state of New Jersey was impacted by college affordability; for those who did enter college, a smooth path to graduation was a challenge. What emerged was a critique of the value of college degree and calls for measurable approaches to student success. Learn more about how Rutgers University–Camden developed an “all in” strategy focused on access, equity, and student success—including our K12 efforts, Bridging the Gap (our innovative program focused on greatly reducing or completely eliminating student debt), and our student success efforts that holistically support students along the path to a timely graduation.

Speakers
avatar for Nyeema Watson

Nyeema Watson

Associate Chancellor for Civic Engagement, Rutgers University—Camden
JR

Jason Rivera

Vice Chancellor, Rutgers University–Camden
KW

Keith Wardrip

Research Manager, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
CW

Craig Westman

Vice Chancellor for Enrollment, Rutgers University-Camden



Tuesday October 22, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Millennium Hall 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

2:45pm

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.

Tuesday October 22, 2019 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

A Teachers Village for Nashville: Making the Case
The Nashville Civic Design Center, our School's "think tank" and 19-year partnership, two years ago urged us to conduct an outreach engagement and service-learning urban design study to focus advocacy for a “Teachers Village” in Metro Nashville. This began with a conversation that emerged in the Office of the Mayor regarding the desirability of a public/private initiative for affordable housing to help stabilize the Metro Nashville Public School’s (MNPS) teaching workforce.

Young teachers, and thereby children and their parents, are subject to a problematic level of attrition. These undercompensated “everyday heroes” have high turnover rates in staffing, as they are able to find lower costs of living outside the county, though unfortunately with lengthy commutes and estrangement from the local communities in which they teach. Many find higher levels of compensation in outer suburban or rural schools systems and leave the MNPS within their first four years of teaching, with some leaving mid-year, or even mid-semester, from their K-12 classroom assignments. This can be very disruptive to classroom morale and curriculum advancement.

The site is now a city-owned school bus depot facility located on public transit. The topography is something of an “acropolis”, featuring excellent views of the downtown skyline.

I will show and discuss the various design projects proposed by my students and I. We were recently excited to learn that the current Mayor has been persuaded to issue an RFP to relocate the bus depot, followed by the development of the site as a Teachers Village.

Speakers
TK

Thomas K. Davis

Professor, University of Tennessee Knoxville College of Architecture + Design


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Around the Corner, Across the Globe: Developing Global Citizens Through Civic Engagement
Baccalaureate nurses are educated to provide equitable health care services to vulnerable, underserved populations, yet, they are often unprepared to care for individuals and families within these marginalized communities effectively. Nursing educators wrestle with preparing the future nursing workforce to meet the needs of these populations that suffer significant health disparities. This presentation focuses upon the integration of engaged civic learning (ECL) within a social justice framework for developing nurses as global citizens to provide culturally congruent.

In preparation for these ECL experiences, both university administration and faculty targeted outreach to schools, hospitals, clergy, and other organizations within the local urban community, and these efforts led to multiple partnerships that served as a basis for our students’ experiences. Engaged civic learning was integrated into every level of nursing education, within schools, churches, shelters, health care centers, and a fitness center.

Because of the high percentage of Spanish-speaking residents (40%), many with limited English proficiency, we collaborated with the World Languages department to develop a comprehensive Spanish for Health Professionals program, which helps students at any level of Spanish language proficiency—from novice to heritage speakers—to effectively communicate with these populations. Health-related international experiences further expanded students’ ECL to countries such as Guatemala, Cuba, and South Africa. Preparation for these experiences includes in-depth analysis of the historical and socio-political aspects of the country with lessons in cultural humility and congruence. Students—from their entrance into nursing school until graduation—journey toward becoming engaged global citizens caring for increasingly diverse populations.

Speakers
DN

Donna Nickitas

Dean and Professor, Rutgers University, School of Nursing-Camden
avatar for Nancy Hurley Pontes

Nancy Hurley Pontes

Assistant Professor, Rutgers University, School of Nursing-Camden
Dr. Nancy Pontes is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers University, School of Nursing Camden. She is a nationally certified, family nurse practitioner with over 20 years’ experience working with a variety of vulnerable populations in the US and globally. The overarching focus of... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Choosing to Change: Promising Practices in University-Corrections Partnerships
This “Best Practices” session will highlight a partnership between Portland State University and Columbia River Correctional Institution that, following the model of Temple University’s Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, brings together “inside”/incarcerated students with “outside”/University students to form an inclusive learning community. The presenter will share approaches to establishing, nurturing, and growing productive partnerships across institutional difference; offer insights about liberatory pedagogical strategies to catalyze “education as the practice of freedom” (Freire, 1970); and report on corollary outcomes to the partnership, including publications co-authored by faculty, inside and outside students, and staff.

Bringing non-incarcerated students and faculty inside correctional facilities to learn with and from their incarcerated colleagues provides a rich context for transformative learning for all and invokes a lived sense of possibility in imagining and co-constructing the world as we’d like it to be. Given the dislocation both inside and outside students tend to experience in this sort of boundary-crossing learning community, they must confront what Mezirow (2000) identified as “disorienting dilemmas” in their encounters with each other and with the material at the center of their inquiry. Fundamentally, “Writing as Activism” as a course, Inside-Out as a program, and progressive educational and other programming inside correctional institutions more generally, reflect this core feature of transformative learning theory: that experiencing disorienting dilemmas provide the foundation from which learners might expand our frames of reference, experiment with new frames of reference, shift our perspectives, enlarge our habits of mind, and engage intentionally as agents of change in our world.

Speakers
avatar for Vicki Reitenauer

Vicki Reitenauer

Faculty, Portland State University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Creating Value: A Call to Improve Student Achievement Through Instructional Quality
Doubts about higher education’s value are a clarion call to create more value, more equitably, for millions more Americans. Studies consistently find a positive return on higher education. But efforts to better communicate this value are, alone, insufficient. The national average graduation rate of approximately 50% indicates we can expand the value we generate simply by retaining and graduating more well-prepared and career-ready students. Launching more well-prepared students into the world is not only good public relations—it’s our mission.

In this interactive session, facilitators will prompt attendees to consider how they create and communicate the value of higher education at their institutions, with a particular focus on instructional quality and student success. Participants will explore the questions: How does high-quality teaching contribute to institutional value? What is the role of faculty in retaining and graduating more well-prepared students, who communicate the value of their education as alumni?

The Gallup-Purdue Index finds that faculty can double the odds of graduates thriving in their work and lives. Participants in this session will reflect on the preparation and support faculty members need—and deserve—to create the meaningful learning experiences that change students’ lives and serve as the genesis of our value.

Speakers
avatar for Charity Peak

Charity Peak

Academic Director, ACUE
Dr. Charity Peak is an Academic Director at the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE). With 20 years of broad-based curriculum design and teaching experience ranging from Pre-K to graduate school, Peak is passionate about student success and faculty development.
avatar for Margaret Wood

Margaret Wood

Associate Vice Chancellor, University of Colorado Denver
Margaret is the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Achievement at the University of Colorado, Denver. She is a Professor of Anthropology, worked as the Director for the Center for Faculty Development, and Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Embracing Transparency and Vulnerability: A Dialogue on Community-Engaged Anchor Work
How can our Community Engagement and our Anchor Mission work align to provide opportunities to strengthen relationships between our institutions and the communities that are most impacted by this work? Particularly in areas that involve a hard look at University business practices, it can be challenging to bring community members into the decision-making process in a meaningful way. However, working with these challenges can result in a more impactful Anchor program, stronger partnerships and new advocates. In this Community Conversation, representatives from several of the institutions in CUMU’s Anchor Learning Network will share how they’ve grappled with this tension, including some of the experiences and tough questions raised by intentional engagement around their local purchasing, hiring, resource allocation and development practices. Conversation will touch on data sharing and goal-setting, community benefits agreements and accountability mechanisms and developing mutually beneficial partnerships and programs. Some tools and best practices will be offered. These include the creation of a Community Development Working Group, a local Anchor partnership and the development of a series of neighborhood-based Community Engagement Centers that incubate innovative anchor approaches that can be scaled to institutional strategies over time.

Speakers
avatar for Kelsey Otero

Kelsey Otero

Associate Director, Social Innovation, Marquette University
avatar for Lina D. Dostilio

Lina D. Dostilio

Associate Vice Chancellor for Community Engagement, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Lina Dostilio is the Associate Vice Chancellor for Community Engagement at the University of Pittsburgh. She is responsible for supporting community-facing work that includes community relations, cultivating strategic opportunities to advance Pitt’s community engagement agenda... Read More →
AB

Alyssa Berman-Cutler

Executive Director, Community Development, University of Chicago


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Jefferson 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Lightning Session: Cultural Competence, Higher-Order Thinking, and Research Skills among Student Participants in a Multidisciplinary, Community-Engaged Research Mentoring Intervention
Three multidisciplinary faculty (Nursing, Sociology, History) formed a partnership with the belief that preparing students in the health professions and social sciences to become more holistic healthcare providers and better public policy advocates includes engaging in small-scale interventions that include multidisciplinary community-engaged (CE) research. Working over two academic years, we created a student-focused voluntary mentoring intervention in maternal and child health (13 nursing, 2 social science) designed to explore whether a diversified research experience (CE, multidisciplinary mentoring) increase cultural sensitivity and/or desire to work in underserved communities; assess how exposure to multidisciplinary, CE research at the bachelor’s level may have encouraged plans for graduate study; and explore students’ overall experiences with the CE research process. Each student participated in a variety of mentored research experiences including multidisciplinary workshops introducing discipline-specific research methodologies, involvement in every stage of CE research, spending time in the local community to see firsthand how health inequities are manifested, and social determinants of health at work. Using qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews and pre- and post- experience writing exercises, we established the following learning outcomes for our students: 1) exposing students to multidisciplinary, CE research positively impacted learning and understanding related to individual health of community members in the broader social context, 2) students reported increased interest in working with persons in underserved communities related to their experience, and 3) student engagement in CE research appears to have increased interest in pursuing graduate degrees.

Speakers
JD

Jessica Devido

Assistant Professor, Duquesne University School of Nursing
Assistant Professor Jessica Devido is an educator, researcher and clinician with a particular interest in maternal and children's health. A board certified pediatric nurse practitioner, Dr. Devido has worked as an obstetric nurse, and she is the current past president of the Three... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Lightning Session: Increasing Learner Access and Success through Leveraging Micro-Credentials
Micro-credentialing, most notably through digital badging, has continued to increase in popularity within higher education. While most institutions have developed micro-credentials with a narrow scope, a few, including Florida International University (FIU), have approached micro-credentialing from a holistic perspective. FIU recognizes that we must be responsive to providing opportunities for workforce development to the community, while creating innovative on-ramps to degrees; help our current students understand the competencies that they are gaining to create a cohesive narrative for post-graduation employment; and ensure that our alumni have the chance to re-certify or up-skills competencies once they enter the workforce. This holistic approach strengthens FIU’s commitment to the economic development of community and social mobility of all learners. The purpose of the presentation will be to share how FIU is designing this holistic micro-credential approach that benefits these three groups of learners and our industry partners. The presenters will discuss the context for micro-credentialing at FIU, the policies and procedures developed, and examples of how we have leveraged these tools within workforce development, curriculum, and co-curricular activities.

Speakers
avatar for Bridgette Cram

Bridgette Cram

Assistant Vice President, Florida International University
Bridgette Cram is Director of Academic Programs & Partnerships at FloridaInternational University, where she works with external partners to operationalize student success initiatives; and the local school boards to ensure success of incoming and current students. Bridgette also... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Lightning Session: Out of the Pipe and on to the Path: A Person-Centered Approach to Accessing Higher Education
The Office of Engagement at the University of Utah is working with Continuing Education to build a cohesive, continuous, and accessible pathway of K-16 programs, engaging K-16 students and their families. Presenters will discuss programs housed within the Office of Engagement, share both successes and challenges on their journey to normalize the college-going process for all students and in particular students from low income, first generation, and/or underrepresented backgrounds. The Office of Engagement has created cohesive programming and resources that give the students a strong sense of belonging, which in turn show the student that higher education is a realistic option and can become a very successful venture. The presenters will focus on two of the pathway programs, the First Star Academy and the Utah College Advising Corps. First Star improves the lives of foster youth by partnering with child welfare agencies, universities, and school districts to ensure foster youth have the academic, life skills, and adult supports needed to successfully transition to higher education and adulthood. We pursue our mission through innovative college-preparatory programs, providing technical assistance to stakeholders, and advocating for policy change. The Utah College Advising Corps, a University of Utah program that, for over a decade, has successfully helped students navigate the process of getting into college. This program has been in 12 Utah high schools since 2007 and has demonstrated effectiveness in improving college enrollment and college graduation rates. This program is in the first phase of a state-wide expansion.

Speakers
NB

Nicole Batt

Director, University of Utah
Nicole Batt is the Director of the Office of Engagement and Director of the Utah College Advising Corps. As a first-generation college student, Nicole completed both her B.S. in Communication and a Masters in Public Administration at the University of Utah, and is currently working... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Lightning Session: Start Small, Win Big!
Anchored in a shrinking, segregated, and deindustrializing city, the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) is surrounded by communities with systematically depressed health, economic, and social outcomes. As a highly specialized public institution, UMB spends hundreds of millions of dollars each year in relatively narrow spending categories that are intensely competitive, such as medical equipment, lab supplies, chemicals, and other technology. And this spending is done in a highly regulated and restrictive purchasing environment.

Despite these frustrating, but common challenges, how is UMB working to drive new revenue to small businesses owned by marginalized people in communities surrounding its campus? What spending strategies can be leveraged by both private and public institutions to improve economic opportunity in neighboring communities?

Speakers
AV

Ashley Valis

Executive Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore
avatar for William Joyner

William Joyner

SENIOR ECONOMIC INCLUSION SPECIALIST, UMB
As UMB's economic inclusion specialist, Bill Joyner works with internal and external stakeholders to advance the University's community engagement strategy. He focuses on community economic development issues such as local purchasing, youth employment, and housing affordability... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Lightning Session: Urban Youth Leadership Academy: A College Pipeline Partnership Model
The Urban Youth Leadership Academy (UYLA) is designed to prepare middle school students for high school selection and college admissions through their involvement in leadership projects, effective mentorship, and on-campus scholarly activities. Urban Youth Leadership Academy participants are enrolled in a 9-month program that create opportunities for youth to develop personal strengths into leadership skills, foster inverse relationships between youth and their schools and community so they become designers of their environment, and provide access to choice high schools and admissions counseling. The goal of the Urban Youth Leadership Academy is to increase admissions to top performing high schools and to create pathways to college. We provide a cohort of middle school students the opportunity to be leaders by managing a self-designed School Improvement Project. They are awarded a small seed grant and given executive choice in how to plan, budget, and implement their service project along with full access to university resources and personnel to do so. As students redesign their environments, they will become agents of change and begin to rewrite false narratives about their role in the school and community. Here students are introduced to a cross-sector network of African American and Latino men and women who will be able to impart knowledge and wisdom from their experience in navigating social and systemic issues of race, gender, and schooling.

Speakers
JB

Juwan Bennett

Co-Founder of the Urban Youth Leadership Academy, Temple University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Domicology: The Study of Structural Abandonment and its Implications for Universities and Communities
Economic decline, disinvestment, racial segregation, natural and manmade disasters leave communities with unprecedented amounts of abandonment and blight that exacerbate declining economic, social, and environmental conditions. The dominant end-of-life paradigm for manmade structures that have no reuse potential is to allow these structures to sit vacant, imposing substantial social, economic, and environmental costs on communities. Nationwide, the distribution of vacant homes tends to be concentrated; nearly 40 percent of vacant homes are located in just 10 percent of all census tracts (Duke 2012) and more than half of the census tracts with vacancy rates of 20 percent or higher were in just 50 counties in the US, many of which are in the service areas of urban and metropolitan universities.

Researchers at Michigan State University in partnership with public and private thinkers and doers are creating a critical, intellectual anchor to support the Science of Domicology, a new paradigm of the built environment that emphasizes the life cycle of structures and seeks to understand and improve the ways in which the built environment is designed, planned, built, maintained, repurposed, and – when it has reaches its functional end of life – deconstructed in order to promote social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Universities have an important role to play in advancing scholarship, outreach, training and practice in advancing this new paradigm.

This session will explore Domicology its opportunities and challenges for scholars and discuss possible collaborations on and off campus that can change the future of structural abandonment in our society.

Speakers
RL

Rex LaMore

Director, Michigan State University, Center for Community and Economic Development-MSU
Rex LaMore is Director of the Michigan State University’s Center for Community Economic Development and a member of the faculty of the Urban and Regional Planning Program. Dr. LaMore has over 40 years of experience in Community and Economic Development and has focused his career... Read More →
GB

George Berghorn

Assistant Professor, Michigan State University, School of Planning, Design, and Construction


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

West Philadelphia Promise Neighborhood: Preparing Youth for College and Career Success
The West Philly Promise Neighborhood (WPPN) is a place-based U.S. Department of Education-funded grant to support "cradle-to-career" opportunities for local children and their families. The grant focuses on systems building to link and align existing programs and providers rather than implementing standalone programs.

Using a systems approach, WPPN collaborates with city-wide partners working both in and outside of schools to create an education pipeline from Pre-K through college and/or career. To prepare students for success in this environment, academic proficiency and career exploration must start early and continue throughout high school. Through ongoing network building, WPPN strives to create a dedicated system of youth service providers and stakeholders whose missions are centered around a common set of long-term student outcomes in collaboration with Drexel University goals. In this way, students are exposed to a continuum of opportunities and experiences that prepare them for later success.

The purpose of this workshop is to engage participants in discussing the needs of youth and youth providers across the college and career pipeline. Presenters will share the value of consistent and committed adults in the lives of high school-aged youth in addition to their experiences and expertise in supporting youth development and the connection to university initiatives. Session participants will have opportunities to ask questions, provide feedback, and connect with colleagues during the session. This session is presented by the West Philadelphia Promise Neighborhood, Fab Youth Philly, and Promise Corps.

Learning Outcomes
  • Participants will be able to identify critical points of support needed for successful youth college and career preparedness.
  • Participants will learn about two different models of place-based youth development. University-based participants will learn the benefits of partnering with external collaborators.

Speakers
BH

Bethany Housman

Director, Promise Corps
avatar for Rebecca Fabiano

Rebecca Fabiano

President & Founder, Fab Youth Philly
For over two decades, Rebecca has been a bold and innovative leader in youth development. She operates from the simple yet powerful philosophy that systems level change must include young people as critical stakeholders and thought partners. She is a natural connector and convener... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Viddy

Rachel Viddy

Project Director, West Philly Promise Neighborhood, Drexel University


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Early College High Schools 2.0: Evidence-Based Approaches to Engage Youth and Families for Educational, Career, and Community Development
Over the past decade, the early college strategy has proved to be a powerful strategy for helping low income and underrepresented students gain access to higher education (Troutman, 2018; An, 2013). Recent analysis shows that these programs are a solid financial investment, generating a return of 15:1 on dollars spent (AIR, 2019) . While many institutions of higher education have developed dual enrollment or early college strategies, critics of the model have pointed to potential unintended outcomes - students failing to thrive in the program, in college, or failing to recruit diverse participants (Gilbert, 2017).

Using an evidence-based approach, programs being launched now focus on the core missions of early colleges, connecting youth less likely to attend college directly out of high school with powerful programming that propels them towards success. This panel will present perspectives from a range of institutions (philanthropy, high school, two-year institutions, and private four-year institutions) that are rethinking these models to maximize community impact and affordability.

Program innovations that will be discussed include: developing programs which tie together high schools, community college, and 4-year college courses; programs that include private as well as public colleges; tying early college programs to scholarship programs; the role of philanthropy in the development of successful programs; and evaluation metrics for early college and dual enrollment initiatives, including real-time data tracking and visualization.

Speakers
LD

Laura Douglas

President, Bristol Community College
LinkedIn: drlauraldouglas
avatar for Marjorie Ringrose

Marjorie Ringrose

Senior Program Officer, Smith Family Foundation
Marjorie Ringrose is senior program officer at the Smith Family Foundation. She oversees the Foundation's education strategy and philanthropic investments, focusing on new pathways to high-value postsecondary credentials for students historically underrepresented in higher education... Read More →
avatar for Russ Olwell

Russ Olwell

Assoc Dean, Education and Social Policy, Merrimack college
We are here to present about our early college work in Lawrence, MA, but also would be happy to talk about community engagement graduate programs, jail education or programs for people with disabilities!
avatar for Isabelle Cherney

Isabelle Cherney

Dean, Education and Social Policy, Merrimack college
Gender equity, STEM, Early College, and teacher preparation.


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:00pm

Erie Refocused: A University's Role in Private, Public, and Non-Profit Urban Revitalization
A jarring comprehensive decision making guide, Erie Refocused, challenged Erie, Pennsylvania to address root causes of decades of Post-Industrial decline. This intensive study bluntly laid out Erie’s past, current reality, and perilous future chiding all sectors to immediately and fully engage in a cohesive economic development strategy to turn the trend of economic decline toward growth. This $600 million comprehensive plan was published on the heels of a close mayoral election. Mayor Schember (D) was sworn in and John Persinger, the republican nominee, was appointed as President and Executive Director of a new Erie Downtown Development Corporation funded by ($28M) of private business investment including $10M million from the three downtown anchor institutions, Erie Insurance, Gannon University, and UPMC Hamot Hospital. Neighborhood revitalization initiatives in key downtown east-side (BEST) and west-side (OWB) neighborhoods book-ending the urban commercial core also received enhanced attention and investment. Regional university efforts to drive innovation and business and job creation were being organized around an Innovation Beehive hub design and new leadership and alignment of the Erie Regional Chamber and Growth Partnership poised to support business attraction and support. This panel will explore opportunities and challenges inherently exposing unifying and competing interests as a city and region attempt to focus on increasing the tax base and potential for market-rate and mixed-income housing while accentuating business and job growth and a city-wide attention on inclusion and diversity. Panel participants represent and reflect the various players and perspectives in an urban center setting out to transform itself.

Speakers
AF

Anna Frantz

Executive Director, Our West Bayfront
KT

Keith Taylor

President, Gannon Universiity
ER

Erika Ramalho

Director, Community and Government Relations, Gannon University
JP

John Persinger

President and Executive Director, Erie Downtown Development Corporation
KW

Kathy Wyrosdick

Planning Director, City of Erie


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Commonwealth A2 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

3:30pm

40 years “Keep the Community Informed” University and Community Culturally Based Education: Pan African Studies Community Education Program
Temple University Pan African Studies Community Education Program (PASCEP) was coalesced from the vision of Annie D. Hyman, a TU School of Social Work graduate, to gain access of resources from the university for the community. In collaboration with the then Pan African Studies Department, administrators, faculty, staff and community professionals provided continuing education and noncredit courses at no cost or a nominal fee to community learners. The programs educational foundation utilized cultural sensitivity and trauma informed care by teaching the community about their history from Africa to the civil unrest in North Philadelphia. 40 years later, PASCEP continues to meet the need of the community through data driven strategies that includes workforce development, adult basic education and transition to higher education for nontraditional students. Through intentional coordinated alignment among the university colleges, workforce, economic development, community organizations and other stakeholders, PASCEP developed a Workforce Connection Hub as an access point for community members. Community Thursday provides opportunities to address trending topics, community centered concerns and facilitates civic discourse and information. Evening Classes provide noncredit courses and certifications that develop personal, professional and organizations efficiency. The programs target audience includes: returning citizens, disabilities including mental health, adult literacy learners, unemployed and underemployed in the eight zip codes around the University.

Speakers
avatar for Ulicia Lawrence-Oladeinde

Ulicia Lawrence-Oladeinde

Director Community Education, Temple University/Community Relations (PASCEP)
The Pan African Studies program has been the "Community Liaison" for 40 years. This totally Volunteer based education program provides a "give back" for everyone who believes in education the community internal and external to the University. Social Justice and Cultural Competence... Read More →


Tuesday October 22, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:15pm

Meet for Reception Transportation
For transportation to the Pennovation Center Networking Reception, please gather in the Millennium Foyer.

Tuesday October 22, 2019 4:15pm - 4:15pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

4:30pm

Networking Reception: The Pennovation Center
Closeout day two with pre-dinner socializing and hospitality in of the nation’s newest and most celebrated university technology incubators, Pennovation Center. Attendees get a rare insider’s tour of the new building developed by the University of Pennsylvania which blends innovators, inventors and entrepreneurs from the physical and life sciences; who are translating their ideas into new companies. This special reception also includes a self-guided tour of this cutting-edge facility and the chance to meet Philadelphia’s most dynamic innovators and scientists who are on site to talk about their groundbreaking discovery.

Penn’s Executive Vice President, Craig R. Carnaroli and Provost Wendell Pritchett will welcome CUMU attendees and tells the story of how Penn converted an abandoned one-hundred-year-old manufacturing facility into a modern marvel which is now home to more than 80 companies; including Penn startups and business leaders such as Qualcomm, Hershey, and Johnson and Johnson.

Beer, wine, and heavy appetizers will be served. Transportation provided to and from Loews Philadelphia Hotel.

Tuesday October 22, 2019 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA
 
Wednesday, October 23
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Breakfast in Commonwealth B, C, D, and Foyer

Wednesday October 23, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday October 23, 2019 7:30am - 12:00pm
Millennium Foyer 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Anchor Districts: Best Practices for Institutions and the Positive Outcomes that can be Engendered by their Creation
Click the button above to view our Tool for Finding Potential Anchor Districts!

When universities and hospitals share a common geography, they can transform their neighborhood into a unique urban typology – an Anchor District. Anchor Districts are somewhat like hybrids of neighborhood improvement and business improvement districts, in which proximate institutions leverage their collective demand to deliver economic, cultural, and equitable benefit to their surrounding communities. The positive impacts of several existing Anchor Districts are well documented -- University City (Philadelphia), Midtown (Detroit), University Circle (Cleveland). However, the raw ingredients necessary to forge new Anchor Districts are present in many more cities throughout the country, from Tampa Bay to Seattle.

Speakers
SO

Shea O'Neill

Research Manager, U3 Advisors
Shea joined U3 Advisors in 2013 as a research analyst to help build internal capacity for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) research. Since that time, Shea has grown to manage and guide much of U3 Advisor’s analytics, including real estate scans, mapping institutional demand... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Family Matters: A Model for Family Engagement and Empowerment; Rutgers Future Scholars Family Academy
The Rutgers Future Scholars (RFS) Program is a university-wide initiative founded in 2007 to increase high school retention and graduation rates, and college enrollment and completion of low income, underrepresented but academically promising students starting in the 7th grade. Rutgers Future Scholars who are admitted to Rutgers receive tuition aid via grants and/or a gap scholarship. RFS provides students with opportunities for educational growth, social development, and personal enrichment and has positively impacted thousands of first-generation students across New Jersey by making higher education possible.

The Rutgers Future Scholars Family Academy was established in 2015 with the goal of connecting families to resources and opportunities in order to be active participants in their children’s education. Our Family Academy model allows us to assist parents by creating pathways for advocacy and providing support and information on how to leverage community and campus resources for family benefit. The model is built on the belief that access to information allows families to make the most informed and best decisions about their child’s education and future and keeps Scholars connected to the program. Research shows that parental involvement is a key component in student success so we will share approaches to engage families and create a bridge that means better outcomes for students. Participants will leave the workshop with resources and tools on how to develop a successful family engagement program to implement within their own community.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Phillips

Brian Phillips

Program Coordinator, Rutgers University–Camden, Office of Civic Engagement
Brian Phillips serves as the Senior Program Coordinator for the Rutgers Future Scholars Program under the Office of Civic Engagement at Rutgers-Camden. In partnership with Aramis Gutierrez (Director) and Dr. Nyeema Watson (Associate Chancellor of Civic Engagement) Brian oversees the... Read More →
avatar for Alejandra Barajas

Alejandra Barajas

Program Coordinator, Rutgers Future Scholars, Rutgers University–Camden, Office of Civic Engagement
Alejandra works to leverage educational opportunities for Camden youth. Her work with the program allows her to live out her mission to increase the representation, persistence and successful college matriculation of traditionally underrepresented students in higher education.Alejandra... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Lightning Session: Being Apart Of The Solution: How Higher Education Institutions Can Support Public Schools In Creating A “Loving” Environment
Richmond Public School system has the lowest graduation rates in Virginia. Richmond Public School Superintendent Jason Kramas explains the need to lead with “love”. Defining “Love” as “having high expectations for kids...car[ing] about the whole child. Leading with love means [is] about social justice and changing lives for kids.” Virginia Commonwealth University, being one of the state’s largest academic institutions and Richmond’s largest employers, impacts the public school system. VCU can support Richmond Public School efforts to increase graduation rates by engaging students through pipeline programs focused on academic and career exposure and attainment. The panel discussion will explore how our higher education institution can support community efforts in providing greater college access opportunity to Richmond public school students

VCU Health Sciences Pipeline is comprised of our faculty and staff, program partners and most importantly students, the Pipeline alumni. Together we are breaking health science education barriers, fostering student success and diversifying the health care workforce.

Two programs in particular engage public school students. “From Jump Rope to Stethoscopes” exposes middle school students to healthcare careers, and “Health Sciences Academy” offers high school students dual college-credit, college-preparedness skills and health career exploration. Richmond Public Schools student engagement efforts are supported by RVA Future Centers whose goal is to increase the number of Richmond Public Schools graduates accessing quality post-high school college and career opportunities, by providing a strong system of support, information, and assistance to RPS high school students.

Speakers
PB

Porsha Bennett

Manager of Patient Transportation, VCU Health System


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Lightning Session: How One Campus Created a Space for Intellectual Discussion Outside of the Classroom
La Salle University’s Explorer Café is an informal, interdisciplinary forum that brings the campus community together for engaging, interactive discussions on thought-provoking topics. Cafés are open to the entire community and no prior experience or technical expertise is required for participation. Cafés were created to address the lack of engaged intellectual discussion outside of the classroom and the reluctance of community members to dialogue around controversial topics.

Two main components characterize a typical café event: the initial background or introduction to a topic that frames a question (may involve a BRIEF presentation, informal remarks, multimedia, etc.) followed by group discussion. Facilitators are invited to frame the title of the café in the form of a question and to maintain a commitment to inquiry rather than to agendas or lessons learned as take-aways. A good facilitator introduces a topic, provides just enough background information, and raises compelling questions that launch the room into discussion in pairs, small groups, or as a plenary. Conversations are unscripted and can be far ranging. Group discussion lets the audience's natural curiosity and interest play a role in deciding what aspects of a topic are discussed. Facilitators are coached to employ pedagogical techniques that promote dialogue and ongoing consideration of a topic from multiple perspectives.

Some recent cafés include:
• When is it right to do wrong?
• What does my DNA have to say about my identity?
• Do unions belong on university campuses?

Speakers
avatar for Tara Carr-Lemke

Tara Carr-Lemke

Assistant Director, De La Salle Institute, La Salle University
student-led deliberative dialogue and conversation, community-based teaching and learning, immigrant rights organizing


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Lightning Session: Inside Out-People-Centered Approach to Growth
Economic development plays a major role in revitalizing neighborhoods by creating new opportunities for education, business development and job creation. Most large-scale development and redevelopment investments focus on exterior placemaking, however-people actually live, work, and learn inside these “places” i.e. buildings. Both interior and exterior space should be thought through in tandem as a source of energy, to boost community. Together they have the power to inspire people, in order to be a catalyst for trust and social impact. Sadly interior spaces are often ignored in upfront planning and development. When developers plan around people, not buildings, they are ragingly more successful. They create thriving hubs of opportunity where people want to be and result in projects that drive economic development, promote growth and foster creativity. This lightning session will give you context for creating people-centered spaces that you can implement right away.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Ennis

Kelly Ennis

Founder, The Verve Partnership
Community. Design. Strategy. Neighborhood Development. Economic Development. Workplace. Education.


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Lightning Session: One Caring Person: A Proactive Approach to Supporting Wellness on College Campuses
The culture of perfection that pervades today's college campuses is damaging to student mental wellness. According to the American College Health Association, 62% of college students report having felt “very lonely” within the past year. Suicide is now the second-leading cause of death among college-aged students.

The Reflect Organization was founded at the University of Pennsylvania to address this issue and has grown to become a national mental wellness nonprofit. Reflect’s college and university chapters are dedicated to empowering students to foster a culture of authenticity, self-love, and allyship on campus.

The latest developmental research has shown that with the right support, just one caring person can break the cycle of adversity in a young person's life. This lighting presentation will draw on this research, focusing on how each audience member can be that one caring person, forging a more resilient, well community.

Speakers
JF

Jared Fenton

President, The Reflect Organization


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Lightning Session: The University of Massachusetts School of Law Public Interest Law Fellows Program: Building Civically Engaged Students, Lawyers, and Community
The University of Massachusetts School of Law is the only public law school in Massachusetts. It is part of the UMass Dartmouth campus which is located in the Southcoast of Massachusetts. This region is economically challenged as evidenced by unemployment rates twice the state average and educational attainment levels which are among the lowest in the state.

A central theme of the law school's mission is public service. Since 2010 law students have performed over 125,000 hours of pro bono community service valued at over $6 million. The focus on public service has led to both regional and national recognition.

One of the signatures programs at the law school is the Public Interest Law Fellowship Program (PILF) which is designed to train students for careers in public service. The program includes a 50% reduction in tuition and fees in exchange for a commitment to practice public interest law for 4 years upon graduation. In addition to the post-graduation employment requirement, students are required to attend 50 events focused on public policy topics and to perform 200 hours of pro bono community service. Students are placed in over 100 locations throughout the region. Throughout their entire law school experience, PILF students are at the front line of public service and these experiences are reflected in the career paths chosen upon graduation. This program is the ultimate "win/win" - volunteer experiences educate students, form engaged citizens, and provide much needed assistance to the local community.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Roy

Matthew Roy

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Civic Engagement, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Service-LearningDirector of Leduc Center for Civic EngagementDirector of the Career Center
JQ

John Quinn

Asst. Dean of Public Interest Law, UMass Law School
Asst. Dean of Public Interest Law and External RelationsFormer elected member of the Massachusetts State LegislatureDirector of the Public Interest Law Fellowship Program


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Running Innovation Challenges to Advance Institutional Goals and Community Engagement
Running Innovation Challenges to Advance Institutional Goals and Community Engagement

Social change institutions are increasingly using "challenges" to incubate innovative ideas to address campus and community issues. In 2018, Schmidt Futures created the Alliance for the American Dream, a collective of 4 large, public research universities that leverage their anchor institution role to run grand challenges focused on strengthening America's middle class.

The University of Utah, a member of the Alliance, strategically designed a community-based, statewide challenge to engage a broad spectrum of perspectives and ideas from the nonprofit, government, business, and entrepreneurial communities. This challenge process garnered new partnerships and deep engagement that has enhanced the university's anchor role in its community.

As universities expand their entrepreneurial footprint, it is critical that more members of a campus and the larger community learn how to leverage the grand challenge format to incubate and develop ideas. Using the experiences of running two challenges at the University of Utah, this session will outline the strategies and outcomes of a statewide, community challenge focused on income disparity and an on-campus degree completion challenge. Attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm issues facing their campus communities and explore how a challenge model could engage various stakeholders to partner for positive social change.

Speakers
CM

Courtney McBeth

Special Assistant to the President, University of Utah
CS

Cassie Slattery

Administrative Manager, University of Utah


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Applying the UN Sustainable Development Goals to Local Community Engagement
Adopted by the United Nations in 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development includes 17 goals that comprise a “shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet.” The interconnected 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provide an action-oriented framework for addressing global issues. Even though the SDGs were developed with a global lens, the subsequent targets and indicators for each goal also serve as a context for local civic engagement and a shared language for public discourse. Due to the inherent nature of achieving global impact and outcomes being dependent on local action, the SDGs encourages the collective and transdisciplinary work for the betterment of all people and all communities. This workshop will provide an overview of the UN’s 2030 Agenda and the 17 SDGs while exploring the possibilities for transdisciplinary practices that advance local and global communities. Workshop facilitators will illustrate how they integrate the SDGs into preparing students to become engaged citizens through student programs in the Fitz Center for Leadership in Community at the University of Dayton (UD), along with examples of how UD as a whole incorporates the goals into their urban mission integration. Through a series of rapid ideation methods, group dialogue, design challenges, and transdisciplinary collaboration, attendees will have the opportunity to explore how the SDGs connect to the urban mission integration and identify how they can incorporate the SDGs into civic engagement initiatives at their institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Castel Sweet

Castel Sweet

Community Engaged Learning and Scholarship, University of Dayton
Castel is a sociologist who explores the intricacies of community, culture, and race. Castel’s formal training in sociology enables her to comprehensively develop, support, and advocate for ethical and appropriate community-campus collaborations and community engagement at the collegiate... Read More →
avatar for Karlos L. Marshall

Karlos L. Marshall

Community and Neighborhood Partnerships, University of Dayton
Karlos L. Marshall provides strategic direction in the areas of community and neighborhood partnerships for the University of Dayton. This includes collective impact strategies such as the Dayton Civic Scholars and Neighborhood School Centers programs; which leverages asset-based... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

8:30am

An Anchor University's Revitalization Model for Struggling Non-Profits: Incorporating Economic and Leadership Development Partners into the University Mission
Purdue University Northwest is a Metropolitan University located in Northwest Indiana in the Chicagoland area. As an Anchor University, PNW plays an active role in regional economic development, health care, education reform, and community arts. As the University’s impact on the region has grown and evolved, PNW has found new synergies with several non-profits seeking to connect with the university’s expertise, best practices, and resources. Two organizations with a long-standing community presence in Northwest Indiana were the South Shore Leadership Center and the Society of Innovators. While sharing a common mission to build the community and meet the needs of the region, both struggled to maintain their vitality and financial sustainability. Concluding that the University could revitalize the organizations while gaining additional community-development capacity, PNW incorporated both groups into the University, renaming them the Leadership Institute at Purdue University Northwest and the Society of Innovators at Purdue University Northwest. Both organizations are now presided over by an Executive Director who reports directly to the Chancellor. Since incorporation, the organizations have undergone a major rebranding effort to clarify purpose and illustrate the positive connection to PNW. Both organizations have completed a strategic plan process which resulted in new organizational focus, an updated financial model and an expansion of programs designed to impact community growth and intentional economic development.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Keon

Thomas Keon

Chancellor, Purdue University Northwest
avatar for Sheila Matias

Sheila Matias

Executive Director, The Leadership Institute at Purdue Northwest; Society of Innovators at Purdue Northwest
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sheila-matias/
GJ

Gary Johnson

Board Chair, Purdue University Northwest/Society of Innovators


Wednesday October 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:00am

Engage, Empower, and Educate: How the University of Central Oklahoma's Native American Success Initiative Transforms the Lives of Marginalized Students
In 2017, the University of Central Oklahoma launched the Native American Success Initiative (NASI), a retention initiative designed to address the academic, social, cultural, and psychological needs of first year students who identify as Native American. This program was created to positively impact the national narrative that while 28% of Americans graduate from college, just 10% of Native Americans attain a bachelor’s degree.

The purpose of this presentation is to explore the foundational core of NASI which includes intentionally designed curricular, social, and mentor programming focused on cultivating each student’s sense of belonging on campus. Additionally, this presentation will explore the regimented methodology used to engage, educate, and empower NASI students as they persist to graduation.

Speakers
avatar for Dene Roseburr-Olotu

Dene Roseburr-Olotu

Assistant Director, Diversity Retention, University of Central Oklahoma
Dene Roseburr-Olotu is the Assistant Director for Diversity Retention at the University of Central Oklahoma. She also serves as the CEO of Mindnificent Reach, Inc., a non-profit organization that works directly with high need students, from traditionally impoverished backgrounds... Read More →
TP

Timothy Petete

Associate Professor of English, University of Central Oklahoma


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:00am

When 2 + 2 is Not Enough: Strategies for Creating and Sustaining Multi-Campus Transfer Partnerships Focused on Student Success
The “new majority” college student at four-year institutions includes increasing numbers of transfer students; as such improving the two-year to four-year pipeline is critical to meeting national degree attainment goals. Along with community college partners, we will highlight Governors State University’s recognized Dual Degree Program with 17 partner two-year institutions, achieving 90% degree completion rates that creates a structured pathway, with wrap-around support services, to earn their degrees. Participants will receive a manual that outlines how they can scale and replicate this program for their campus.

Speakers
avatar for Aurélio Valente

Aurélio Valente

VP for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Governors State University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:30am

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.

Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

A Resident-Led Model for Out-of-School Time Programming
The desire for high-quality out-of-school time programming in the Norris Homes Community Center presents an opportunity for a meaningful partnership between the Norris Community Residents Council, Inc. (NCRC) and Temple University’s College of Education (TUCOE). A collaborative approach was taken during the planning stages to ensure that the goals are community-driven and that the academic and social needs of Norris children are being met. Therefore, this program is a resident-led model for delivering out-of-school time (OST) education within the community center located at Norris Apartments. The overall goal of this project is to provide assistance to the residents of this community to operate afterschool and summer programs for the children in their neighborhood and ultimately transform this facility into an educational center for their entire community. The curriculum and activities of the afterschool program are academically enriching, project-based, culturally responsive, and aligned to the School District of Philadelphia’s (SDP) standards of academic achievement (e.g., Common Core, PSSA). The NCRC is contracted to provide educational programming, receive professional development on academic instruction and behavior management, and be responsible for the operational aspects of the program. Researchers from Temple University provide the curriculum, standards, and professional development of the NCRC staff to ensure the integrity of service delivery. Temple University is also responsible for program evaluation through data collection, analysis, and reporting. This collaboration requires a continued level of contextual understanding, responsiveness, transparency, joint-decision making, and sustainability efforts.

Speakers
AM

Alexus Moran

Community Engagement Coordinator, Temple University
DR

Donna Richardson

Program Administrator, Norris Community Resident Council


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Educating Business Loan Underwriting Skills: Best Practices for University Involvement in Stimulating Small Business Growth and Jobs in the Community
The primary purpose of a commercial bank is to make loans, specifically, business loans. Making business loans stimulates the economy through growth and expansion, and creates jobs, important for economic prosperity. Marquette University recently established a new program in Commercial Banking to capitalize on the “applied” focus of business education at Marquette. Recognizing the importance of business loans, a curriculum was developed to educate students in the art of underwriting business loans. Because business loans create most of the revenue in a commercial bank, this becomes an important focus for the education of future bankers. With CUMU’s direction to strengthen the fabric of communities this program helps to align these goals with the urban areas served by both Marquette and Milwaukee. Students gain experience by analyzing “live” credits emerging from these communities. A loan fund of approximately $1,000,000 was established, through a local community bank and in conjunction with the Wisconsin Women’s Business Initiative (WWBIC), a not-for-profit micro-lender, for the sole purpose of extending credit to start-up small businesses within the communities served by the university. Students, in the program analyze these requests, present them to a credit committee of bankers, and extend loans to the local community businesses. The objective is to build a functioning portfolio, managed by the students, which supports the needs of the community and integrates the university with the broader objectives of Milwaukee, as well as the overall economy through job creation, in addition to creating jobs for students and talent for the industry.

Speakers
avatar for Kent Belasco

Kent Belasco

Director, Commercial Banking Program, Marquette University
I have been at Marquette University since 2016. I am a former commercial banker of 37 years, holding the position of EVP and Chief Information and Operations Officer for First Midwest Bank. I have long sought a means of developing a curriculum and educating young people to join... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Effective Ways to Build Capacity for University-Community Collaboration: Lessons from Portland State University
More and more universities are integrating the goal of engagement into their strategic plans and into their work with the broader community to address the complex challenges being created by the rapidly changing social, economic and environmental issues facing our world today. This session will explore recent experiences in creating conditions within an institutional environment and within the broader community that support community engagement. We will discuss the distribution of resources, patterns of collaboration across different parts of the institution and across disciplines and changes in institutional policies and infrastructure. We will reflect on practices that support new forms of engaged scholarship and engaged learning, as well as new patterns of interaction with different sectors of the broader community. Our experience offers lessons about (a) which aspects of the structure and practices of a university are most essential for the support of community engagement in its various forms; (b) ways to create conditions to support more sustainable and meaningful community engagement; (c) adaptations that capture the value and impact of engagement. We will also explore how community engagement in its many forms can impact scholarly activities, the design of the curriculum, and the engagement and involvement of students, faculty and staff in advancing the goal of community engagement. We will offer suggestions about questions that a campus community can ask itself as it seeks to create a supportive environment for engagement and the assessment of the outcomes and value of engagement in its various forms.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Ramaley

Judith Ramaley

President Emerita and Distinguished Professor, Portland State University
Dr. Judith A. Ramaley is President Emerita and Distinguished Professor of Public Service at Portland State University in the Mark O. Hatfield School of Government and President Emerita of Winona State University. From 2005-2012, she served as President of Winona State University (WSU... Read More →
SP

Stephen Percy

President, Portland State University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

When the Best Laid Plans Fail; the Role of Past Experiences in Distressed Communities
Initiatives bridging the town and gown do not occur in a relationship vacuum. Often, the communities affected by projects may have had numerous past experiences with colleges and universities through a variety of interactions. Such past interactions may not have always been positive. In some cases, previous contacts may have created deep mistrust and doubt about university motives may. This mistrust and doubt, as well as other issues associated with past actions place barriers on mutual success. Under extreme conditions, these barriers may derail or limit both successful processes and outcomes. This Community Conversation seeks to examine the problem of trust and relationships in town/gown activities.

Conversation facilitation and the background for the conversation will be provided by two faculty members from Widener University’s Center for Violence Prevention. The faculty were consultants and evaluators of a PSN-Project Safe Neighborhoods violence prevention grant (US Department of Justice). The project, on its face, appeared to have everything working in its favor, including the participation of two nationally known mental health experts (with special expertise in trauma informed care). Yet at the end of the grant, most of the funds had been unspent and participation for the central focus of the project – a community planning group – dropped to almost no one. Research suggested past experiences were the critical factor in the outcomes.

Building on this background, this conversation will examine the problem of trust and previous experiences in communities.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jeannette Wyatt

Dr. Jeannette Wyatt

Associate Professor, Widener University, Center for Social Work Education
Dr. Wyatt is a faculty member in the Center for Social Work at Widener University and teaches in the Masters and Doctoral programs. She has worked with various populations in inpatient mental health and drug and alcohol, outpatient mental health, residential services, child welfare... Read More →
SK

Stephen Kauffman

Professor, Widener University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: Creating Modern On-Ramps to Voting: How to Meet Students Where They Already Are
Through years of supporting student voter engagement efforts, the TurboVote team has worked alongside campuses to conceptualize, refine, and execute best practices for meeting young voters where they already are... online! This lightning presentation will offer attendees a variety of ideas for how to effectively incorporate voter engagement into existing campus structures (think: online student portals, course registration, new student processes) in order to increase student voter turnout in 2020 and beyond. Through the sharing of campus success stories and a bit of audience participation, attendees will walk away with the understanding that, by creating modern on-ramps to voting that leverage the student experience, campuses can strive toward a community culture where registering to vote is as instinctive as registering for classes.

TurboVote is a product of Democracy Works—a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to improve civic participation by simplifying and modernizing the voting process for voters and election administrators. Campuses across the country use TurboVote to empower students to vote in all their elections—local, state, and national. TurboVote helps users register to vote (either in their institution's state or home state), request an absentee ballot, and sign up for text/email election reminders.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Giffin

Emily Giffin

Campus Partnerships Manager, Democracy Works



Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: Dementia Friends: Building a Local Capacity to Address Dementia in Your Community
Dementia Friends launched in February 2013, after only two years, Dementia Friends became one of the biggest ever social movements on any disease. The Dementia Friends Movement gained momentum during the 2015 White House Conference on Aging. People with dementia sometimes need a helping hand to go about their daily lives and feel included in their local community. To provide this helping hand, Dementia Friends aims to give people an understanding of dementia and the small things that they can do to make a difference. From helping someone to find the right bus, to spreading the word about dementia on social media - every action counts.

Speakers
EG

Edwina Garnett

Social Work Student, Coppin State University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: Expanding Partnerships, Developing Preceptor Leadership, & Enhancing Student Preparedness: Combating Health Disparities for Underserved Populations
Issues facing healthcare in the U.S. are lack of access to care and a lack of primary care providers in underserved areas. Chronic conditions associated with the social determinants of health are widespread and disproportionately affect vulnerable groups. Nurse practitioners are a solution to address these issues. However, a lack of practitioners functioning as preceptors and academic-practice partnerships in underserved areas are affecting the number of students who are prepared to meet the diverse needs of underserved populations upon graduating.

This Clinical-Academic Network for Developing Leaders (CANDL) project, funded by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), examines the impact of establishing academic-community partnerships, preceptor education and support, and clinical placements for nurse practitioner students in underserved urban and rural settings for two-years. Strategies aim to prepare graduates to work with underserved populations through community collaborations.

Designated faculty formed partnerships with underserved community sites. Project strategies were implemented over an 18-month period for twenty FNP students. Post-graduate surveys will reveal outcomes for employment intentions for the student participants. Baseline data for self-efficacy related to working with underserved populations for all twenty students demonstrated an increased confidence level providing care to underserved populations.

Preceptors are offered education through interactive modules and have reported increased confidence-level and efficacy as clinical educators before and after their online training. Data has been collected and indicates increased preceptor self-efficacy, especially regarding faculty support and educational tools that outline student performance expectations.

Speakers
MJ

Mary Jo Blanton

FNP, Universtiy of Tennessee at Chattanooga
avatar for Amber Roache

Amber Roache

FNP-Program Coordinator, UTC SON
Nurse Practitioner Coordinator for the Family Nurse and Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP Programs at UT Chattanooga. Primary Investigator of the CANDL Grant, a HRSA grant, to improve academic- community partnerships through increased preceptor support, FNP student placement at undeserved... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: How NYU Engaged in Growing Veteran Entrepreneurship in Brooklyn
NYU Tandon School of Engineering has strategically fostered a pipeline for returning veterans into become entrepreneurs and enter the technology startup ecosystem that is growing in Brooklyn. This pipeline began with the creation of an entrepreneurship program – the Veteran Entrepreneurship Training (VET) program - at the urging of a local elected official and with government support. This program provides participants hands-on experiential learning, mentorship and capstone projects that assist in turning aspirations into career opportunities and new ventures. Soon after the creation of VET, it was clear that participants were creating new ventures and could benefit from an early stage incubator that provided specific resources to veteran owned company. With government support again, and new private industry partners, NYU Tandon opened the first business incubator for military veterans in New York – the Veteran Future Lab. The VET Program and the Veteran Future Lab are located in Industry City, in Sunset Park Brooklyn, one of the most exciting industrial complexes at the heart of the growing tech and entrepreneurship ecosystem in Brooklyn. These programs were made possible only by committed partners in academic, government and private industry. This lightening round will trace how these programs were initiated, the coordination required with all our partners in government and private industry to get them off the ground, and discuss how these programs are expanding in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Pautz

Jennifer Pautz

Senior Director, New York University
As Senior Director for Government Affairs at NYU, Jennifer oversees City and State interactions for the university at large.


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: RAMP:How to Increase College Completion for Underrepresented Youth Through Project-Based Learning
Despite the dozens of elite public and private colleges and universities that call Boston their home, Boston Public Schools’ graduates, historically, struggle to stay in college and college completion rates are staggeringly low. Per a 2016 study funded by The Boston Foundation, only 51% of BPS high school graduates (up from 35% in 2008), who enrolled in college, completed an associate’s or bachelor’s degree within 6 years of graduation. The report also outlined how college graduate rates ranged from just under 40% for African-Americans and Latinx to nearly 75% among Whites and Asians. This gap reflects the obvious: there is a stark difference in race, class, and their educational outcomes.

One solution to this gap is RAMP, an innovative pre-college summer bridge program for underserved Boston youth that is designed to help students navigate the transition from high school to college, and the tools to support their persistence through to degree completion. In eight years, RAMP has introduced nearly 200 youth from Boston to Wentworth by connecting them with peers, enabling them to participate in skill-based workshops, connecting them to Wentworth faculty, staff, and student-mentors, and exploring STEM careers with industry partners, all while immersing them in campus life. Most importantly, interdisciplinary, project-based, hands-on learning has unified each cohort, creating a space where students from all backgrounds, majors, and experience can collaborate on changing their communities. This session will explore the importance of using project-based learning to engage urban youth and create an equity for academic success and college completion.

Speakers
RD

Rebecca Drossman

Assistant Director, College Access, Wentworth Institute of Technology


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: Recruiting a Diverse and Local Workforce at an Urban Research University
One of the greatest assets of any organization is its employees. As a global leader, Penn makes it a priority to create a work environment that welcomes and celebrates diversity. Part of that effort includes engaging locally with communities to provide opportunities for individuals and businesses to participate in the economic activity of Philadelphia’s largest private employer. Penn’s Economic Inclusion Initiative makes this engagement possible.

Penn’s Economic Inclusion Initiative, which began in 1998, consists of three components: Work Force, Supplier Diversity, and Minority Construction. The goal of the Work Force component is to increase employment opportunities by improving job readiness skills and workforce capacity for individuals who live in West and Southwest Philadelphia.

Penn’s Recruitment team uses hiring practices and maintains partnerships to recruit, retain, and develop a highly qualified workforce in communities surrounding Penn. One example, is our partnership with the West Philadelphia Skills Initiative, a training program that connects West Philadelphia employers with their graduates seeking employment opportunities. In this program participants receive cutting-edge job connection strategies and on-the-job training at Penn. University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) is just one of Penn’s facilities that has increased its staff through the initiative, hiring 37 full-time Lab Animal Assistants since 2016.

In fiscal year 2019, Penn participated in 12 local job fairs. Overall, hiring throughout Penn continues to be robust. In fiscal year 2018, the University filled 2,400 positions. Penn is poised to exceed that number in fiscal year 2019, as the University has already made 1,953 hires to date.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Showell

Donna Showell

Manager, Recruitment & Staffing, University of Pennsylvania
Bio Donna Showell is Manager of Recruitment Services in the Division of Human Resources at the University of Pennsylvania. In her role, Donna is responsible for vendor services, community outreach, career development and opportunities. She is also one of three co-chairs for Penn’s... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Lightning Session: Seeking Economic Inclusion through Entrepreneurship Training in Disadvantaged Communities
Entrepreneurship is considered a viable option to upward mobility; however, starting a business requires skills, effort and significant levels of social capital and investment, which may become barriers for nascent entrepreneurs in economically disadvantaged communities. Created in 2016 under IUPUI leadership, SOURCE River West is a community-based initiative to reduce barriers for entrepreneurship and contribute to the economic vitality of the Near West of Indianapolis. Since its inception, SOURCE has provided service to more than 400 business owners and nascent entrepreneurs in Indianapolis. Through training, mentoring, coaching and workshops, the Center supports the launch of entrepreneurial ventures and existing start-up businesses that are expected to provide sustainable wages for the owner, new jobs , and ultimately populate new and rehabbed retail and commercial spaces in the community.

Using a mixed research design, we analyzed the potential of SOURCE as a catalyst to achieve economic and social inclusion. Preliminary results show positive gains in skill building and business creation. In order to create growing and sustainable impact, SOURCE needs to further engage the community in the activities of the Center, proactively follow-up with clients, and expand its network of support in and outside the neighborhood to provide more opportunities for success to local new ventures.

Speakers
SG

Silvia Garcia

Assistant Director of Research, IUPUI Office of Community Engagement


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Developing a Culture of Responsiveness During Institutional Expansion
Utilizing their experience managing community engagement around New York University’s long-term expansion plan in one of the densest urban communities in the nation, presenters will lead a session designed to help attendees create, nurture, and support a culture of institutional responsiveness, from inception and planning to construction and building operations.

The session will focus on providing tools that attendees can use to develop at least three critical functions necessary for transparent and accountable growth:
  • Aligning internal functions across departments, from purchasing to construction management and landscaping, in order to provide timely and accurate information to key stakeholders.
  • Providing a point of contact for community stakeholders regarding proposed expansion plans and ongoing construction, and using this feedback to develop response strategies that reflect the diverse priorities and concerns of various stakeholders.
  • Developing relationships with community leaders and elected officials in order to facilitate successful public approval and review processes.

Speakers
avatar for Nichole Huff

Nichole Huff

Assistant Director, New York University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Washington B 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Pathways of Public Service and Civic Engagement: A Social Change Framework and Collaborative Tool
Stanford University's Haas Center for Public Service has collaborated with 35 public and private two- and four-year stakeholders since 2013 to develop an innovative holistic framework: "Pathways of Public Service and Civic Engagement." (See bit.ly/PathwaysWorkingGroup.) The Pathways collectively describe a range of possibilities by which students can contribute to the common good: community-engaged learning and research; community organizing and activism; direct service; philanthropy; policy and governance; and social entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility.

The framework guides students in exploring how the six Pathways differ from each other in language, practice, and impact. A free online diagnostic tool surfaces student predispositions and interests toward the Pathways; opens students' eyes to lifelong career, engagement, and leadership opportunities; and assists faculty and staff in developing programming to address those opportunities.

Participants will learn about multi-institution research used to identify the Pathways and create the diagnostic tool. Data collected by the tool informs faculty and staff, who can place students in community settings where they have strong Pathway inclinations, encourage students to explore Pathways they had not considered, or ensure they experience all six Pathways in multiple placements during college. Each Pathway provides students with experience they can use with high-impact practices in the classroom, in co-curricular settings, and eventually in the workplace and civil society.

Representatives from participating universities will share how they use the Pathways with (1) a first-year living-learning program, (2) an Institute on Citizen Leadership, (3) a Personalized Education Initiative to enhance student learning, and (4) curricular and co-curricular collaborators and mentors.

Speakers
avatar for Chaz Kellem

Chaz Kellem

Director, PittServes, University of PIttsburgh
Chaz Kellem was appointed Director of PittServes in 2018. The Office of PittServes provides University of Pittsburgh students the opportunity to engage in ethical and sustainable service to the community on a local, national and international scale. Prior to joining Student Affairs... Read More →
AC

Amy Cohen

Executive Director, GW Honey Nashman Center for Civic Engagement and Public Service
avatar for Gail Robinson

Gail Robinson

Pathways Consultant, Stanford University
Gail Robinson is a Maryland-based education consultant and writer who works with college and university faculty, staff, and administrators to develop service learning and community engagement programs. She consults with individual institutions, Campus Compact state affiliates, and... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

9:45am

Comprehensive Evaluation of Civic and Community Engagement
A higher education democratic civic and community engagement movement has developed across the US and around the world to better educate students for democratic citizenship and to improve the quality of life in local communities. Service-learning, engaged scholarship, community-based participatory research, volunteer projects, and community economic development initiatives are some of the means that have been used to create mutually beneficial partnerships designed to make a positive difference in the community and on the campus.

As civic and community engagement initiatives have increased on campuses, there has also been an increased focus on assessment and evaluation. A number of higher education institutions have begun to develop significant, ongoing research and evaluation projects that measure the impact of higher education civic and community engagement work both on local neighborhoods and also on campus. This panel will discuss what a comprehensive evaluation of the work on campus and in the community would entail.

Moderated by Ira Harkavy and Barbara Holland, representatives from three diverse CUMU member institutions – University of Pennsylvania, Loyola University, and IUPUI – will discuss their evaluation efforts to date, including:
  • What is their current community engagement evaluation strategy?
  • Who leads and manages the evaluation? / Where does the responsibility lie?
  • What evaluation and assessment activities are being conducted?
  • What short and long-term results/impacts have been found to date?
  • How are these results being shared with community and campus partners?
  • What impact does evaluation have on university-community partnerships?
  • What is to be done to move evaluation efforts forward?

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Holland

Barbara Holland

Strategy Advisor, CUMU
avatar for Kristin Norris

Kristin Norris

Director of Assessment, IUPUI Office of Community Engagement
Tracking, monitoring, evaluating, and assessing community engaged activities (e.g., community engaged research, teaching & learning, talent development, pipeline programs, outreach programs, events, technical training and assistance, student engagement) in order to tell a more robust... Read More →
avatar for Ira Harkavy

Ira Harkavy

Assoc. VP and Dir, Netter Ctr., University of Pennsylvania
Ira Harkavy is Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships at the University of Pennsylvania. An historian with extensive experience building university-community-school partnerships, he teaches in the departments... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Green

Patrick Green

Executive Director, Experiential Learning, Loyola University Chicago
Patrick M. Green is the Executive Director (founding director) of the Center for Experiential Learning at Loyola University Chicago and a clinical instructor of experiential learning. Green received his doctorate in education from Roosevelt University (Chicago, IL), and his research... Read More →
avatar for Gretchen Suess

Gretchen Suess

Director of Evaluation & Research, Netter Center, University of Pennsylvania
Gretchen E.L. Suess, PhD, is the Director of Evaluation & Research at the Netter Center for Community Partnerships at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). She is also faculty in Penn's Department of Anthropology and a Senior Fellow in the Center for Public Health Initiatives. Dr... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:15am

An Engaged Campus: Institutionalizing the Urban Mission Through Campus and Community Coalition-Building
Institutionalizing community engagement efforts requires the alignment and focus of three key groups of stakeholders: university leadership, members of the campus community (faculty/staff/students), and the external community. Creating a unified coalition among these parties is a challenging task but, only in doing so, can a university create, scale and sustain the integration of the urban mission. This best practices presentation will explore how Marquette University – a mid-sized, liberal arts, urban, Catholic, Jesuit university – is integrating community engagement, leveraging its inclusion as one of the six articulated themes within the institutional strategic plan. The presenters will open the presentation with a brief historical overview of Marquette University, its relationship with the Near West Side community, and the broader city of Milwaukee, and the recent creation of its Office of Community Engagement. Then, the presenters will discuss the successes and challenges of a recent 9-month process utilized to align and focus over 80 key stakeholders, on- and off-campus, in defining the current state, imagining a future state and creating recommendations for institutionalizing community engagement through six identified dimensions: student engagement, faculty/staff engagement, impact, mission, membership and profile, and partnership cultivation and management. Each presenter will provide a unique perspective of the process touching on a variety of topics such as: data collection, campus perspectives, community perceptions, process assessment, strategy and project management. Presenters will take 20 minutes to share context and then use the remaining 10 minutes for dialogue and questions.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Bergen

Dan Bergen

Executive Director, Community Engagement, Marquette University
ST

Sumathi Thiyagarajan

Director of Program Management, Marquette University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am
Anthony 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:15am

Building a Sustainable IT Talent Pipeline: Regional Partnerships for Inclusive Economic Development
Led by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Innovate Birmingham’s durable coalition of 15 community partners and more than 30 employers is woven together by a shared belief: talent is distributed equally in our community but opportunity is not. Our goal is to solve two problems with a unified approach: (1) meet the demand of an IT workforce growing at the second-fastest pace in the country; (2) harness the potential of under- and unemployed youth in Greater Birmingham. Our programs establish a sustainable pipeline of talent in Birmingham to fuel inclusive innovation for local employers, meeting IT workforce demand for the region by offering demand-driven education, training and employment opportunities for area youth who are disconnected from the labor market. The proposed session provides a case study of the Innovate Birmingham workforce development framework effort to strengthen ties between two- and four-year programs and build bridges to non-traditional education programs (such as bootcamps and apprenticeships) while connecting students in local high schools to opportunities for training and development for high demand IT occupations. The purpose of this session is to describe the initiation of the workforce partnership that was critical to the creation of the Innovate Birmingham Workforce Development Program. We will discuss the employer engagement process and how feedback from employers was used to guide the development and reiteration of training program.

Speakers
avatar for Haley Medved Kendrick

Haley Medved Kendrick

Director, Innovate Birmingham/UAB
Haley Medved Kendrick Ph.D. is the Director of Workforce Development for the Innovate Birmingham Workforce Program within the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) External Affairs. Previously, Haley led the Innovate Birmingham operations as Director of Operations. Before joining... Read More →


CUMU pptx

Wednesday October 23, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:15am

Formulating Workforce Solutions: Voices from the Community
In 2018, Temple University instituted the Lenfest North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative which is a collaborative and community-informed effort to develop and implement strategies to help local residents secure gainful employment. Temple LNPWI staff will highlight its data collection and “Table Talk” strategy, as well as other efforts for authentic community engagement. These efforts resulted in participation of over 100 local residents, over 60 leaders representing faith-based institutions, involvement of the offices of 8 elected officials and participation of over 70 service providers and dozens of employers. The LNPWI also effectively engaged numerous university students, staff, faculty, administration and alumni.

Furthermore, the LNPWI embraced and fostered the concept of collaboration, coordination and partnership with other institutions of higher education, workforce development service providers, non-profit organizations and city agencies. This presentation will showcase methodologies that worked, talk about the lessons learned through trials and tribulations, and discuss the associated measurable objectives, which included: enhanced community outreach, increased awareness of programs, leveraged financial and in-kind resources, and new services and partnerships. The LNPWI will share its process for soliciting “concepts” for workforce development programming from both the university and the community-at-large.

The presenters will also explain how various community and university partners contributed to the evaluation design for the LNPWI. The process and outcome indicators -- categorized as youth development, job readiness and workforce development, employment and community/university impact -- for this university-based workforce development strategy will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Shirley Moy

Shirley Moy

Executive Director, LNPWI, Temple University
avatar for Claire Pope

Claire Pope

Program Specialist, Temple University / Lenfest North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative
Claire Pope is a Program Specialist at Temple University's Lenfest North Philadelphia Workforce Initiative. In this role, she supports LNPWI's community engagement, priority population exploration, and reporting efforts to advance LNPWI's mission of strengthening the earning potential... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

10:45am

Coffee Break
Take a break and re-charge! Coffee will be available in the Commonwealth Foyer as well as the 3rd Floor Foyer.

Wednesday October 23, 2019 10:45am - 11:00am
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Building an Inclusive Pipeline from Middle School to Medical School
As the first middle school program funded by the National Cancer Institute’s Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE), the UMB CURE Scholars Program identifies sixth-graders with an interest in science from three West Baltimore middle schools and supports these scholars throughout middle school, high school, and beyond. The UMB CURE Scholars Program is designed to support under-represented minority students by exposing them to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers, exciting experiments, and inspiring mentors. With a 5:1 mentor-to-scholar ratio, scholars participate in after-school hands-on experiments; Saturday tutoring and life skill development workshops; and a comprehensive summer academic enrichment component.

Scholars are selected based on their commitment to a long-term program and not based on academic performance measures. Through rich scientific opportunities, scholars gain presentation experience, academic growth, self-confidence, and the motivation necessary to succeed. The ultimate goal is to increase the pool of under-represented minorities pursuing careers in STEM, health care, and cancer research.

Speakers
AV

Ashley Valis

Executive Director, University of Maryland, Baltimore
avatar for Robin Saunders

Robin Saunders

Founding Executive Director, UMB CURE Scholars Program, University of Maryland, Baltimore
As the executive consultant and founding executive director of the UMB CURE (Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience) Scholars Program, Dr. Robin Saunders possesses more than 30 years of experience in program development, admissions and retention strategies, multicultural education... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

What Happens When an Off-Campus, Community-Based Unit Becomes Integrated into the Academic Mission of a Research-Intensive University?
The University of British Columbia (UBC) established the Learning Exchange (LE) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) in 1999. Since its beginning, the LE has offered free community programming for DTES residents. It was also responsible for community service-learning at UBC until a structural separation in 2011 prompted re-evaluation of the LE’s role. Although well established as a tangible manifestation of UBC’s commitment to community engagement, connection to the academic mission was weak. The LE, situated in the Vice-President External Relations portfolio, was supported by the Provost and Vice-President Academic to create the position of academic director to serve as the academic champion. Since this role began in 2013 significant changes have occurred in the contribution of the LE to student learning and research, while community programming and links to the DTES have also diversified.

In 2013 there were fewer than 20 students at the LE each year, mainly undergraduate volunteers. In 2018, over 200 students took part in in-depth experiential learning placements, mostly on-site, some in community partner organizations. Over 1000 students engaged in one-time activities including workshops and orientations to the DTES. The LE’s role in supporting community-based research (CBR) and knowledge exchange (KE) emerged from community consultations in 2014. The LE leads a multi-faceted KE initiative, Making Research Accessible in the DTES, and meets increasing requests from researchers for support for CBR and KE. The LE’s recognized expertise in experiential learning, CBR and KE, has resulted in opportunities to contribute to new initiatives at UBC.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Towle

Angela Towle

Academic Director, UBC Learning Exchange
I'm Academic Director of the Learning Exchange at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The Learning Exchange is an off-campus unit located in the heart of Vancouver's inner city. For 20 years we've offered free community programming, experiential student learning and, more... Read More →
avatar for Kathleen Leahy

Kathleen Leahy

Director, UBC Learning Exchange
I'm the Director of the Learning Exchange at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The Learning Exchange is an off-campus unit located in the heart of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. For 20 years we've offered free community programming, experiential student learning and, more... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Better Understanding University-Community Project Outputs and Outcomes in San Jose, California: A CommUniverCity SJSU Example and Discussion
CommUniverCity SJSU is a nationally recognized public-private partnership led by San Jose State University (SJSU) that spearheads 40 community-engaged learning projects a year in Central San Jose’s underserved neighborhoods.

Two faculty-led projects in particular help college students understand education inequality in local schools. Just as importantly, course assignments teach students how they can be part of the solution. For one project, Linguistics students are paired with struggling third grade readers where they read aloud together and discuss story themes and characters. In CommUniverCity’s Writing Partners program, fifth graders attending a school where 80% of students are either English-learners or economically disadvantaged exchange a series of letters with SJSU students. At the end of the semester, the pen pals meet face-to-face for a day of conversation and a campus tour.

Facilitators for this workshop will introduce output and outcome measures used for the two CommUniverCity projects described above (e.g., number of volunteer hours, number of students involved, and reading level gains) and lead a discussion among attendees of useful measures for assessing project impact. The challenge of how to measure outputs and outcomes across different types of projects will also be addressed, with a particular focus on the need to demonstrate community benefit.

Speakers
KC

Katherine Cushing

Executive Director, San Jose State University CommUniverCity
EF

Elizabeth Figueroa

Special Programs Manager, CommUniverCity SJSU


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Franklin 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: A Scan of the Field: Urban and Metropolitan Based University Opportunity Youth Programs
Cleveland State University's Center for Community Planning & Development will present the finding of their study on understanding Urban and Metropolitan Based University Opportunity Youth Programs. This scan of the field of CUMU members seeks to understand and contextualize opportunity youth programs for urban and metropolitan based universities and communities. We'll discuss what member institutions are doing to address opportunity youth in their communities, examine best practices for creating, supporting and implementing program for institutions of higher education identify strategies for scaling of successful programs.

Speakers
MS

Molly Schnoke

Project Manager, Cleveland State University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Building Strong Educational Pathways from Early Childhood Development to University: A Case Study of a South African Township
In November 2017, the Kresge Foundation awarded the University of Pretoria and Rutgers University-Newark a twelve month planning grant towards the development of a project known as "The Mamelodi Collaborative" in their respective communities of Newark and Mamelodi. The planning phase, which ended December 2018 identified five niche areas in which the partners could intervene in their respective anchor roles in their communities as well as conduct comparative studies: Broadening Educational Pathways for Post-Secondary School Attainment; Science and the Urban Environment; Leveraging the Arts and Culture, Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods as well as Entrepreneurship and Economic Development

This is a case study report on the niche area "Broadening Educational Pathways for Post- Secondary School Attainment" as applied to the Mamelodi Campus of the University of Pretoria. Inter-faculty collaboration within the university has involved multi-scalar research and transdisciplinary community-based projects addressing access to quality early childhood education on one end, and access to university on the other through a Pre-University Academy (PUA) in STEM academic enrichment.

Partnership with ECD Principals, High School Principals, the Local Government and the departments of Education, Science and Technology and Social Development has been established within the newly formed Mamelodi Community of Learning Collaborative (MCLC) to further the original intention of the Kresge Foundation to support the University’s development of an anchor strategy.

The models developed, their sustainability and lessons learnt from the partnership with Rutgers University-Newark, the role of each of the faculty partners, students and narratives from learners and community members are provided.

Speakers
NA

Nthabiseng Audrey Ogude

Dean and Professor of Science Education, , Mamelodi Campus, University of Pretoria
I am Dean and Professor of Science Education at the University of Pretoria's (UP) Mamelodi Campus in Pretoria South Africa. UP is a historically advantaged and largest research intensive university in South Africa with over 50 000 students. My main responsibility is to oversee the... Read More →
avatar for Kgadi Mathabathe

Kgadi Mathabathe

Head of Community Based Research, University of Pretoria


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Building the Foundation for an Integrative (and Online) Learning Experience at a Metropolitan University: Insights and Lessons Learned
The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) began a journey over a decade ago to create an integrative learning experience for its students. Today, UCO is designated as a metropolitan university that has simultaneously developed a strong immersive learning experience through high-impact educational practices (called the Central Six of Transformative Learning) and online experiences in both hybridized and fully online formats. We review the history of this developmental process, including the arrival of the entrepreneurial Center for e-Learning and Connected Environments (CeCE). We also recount the history of this organization vis-á-vis the development of high-impact practices and how the two have shaped the emergence of the UCO Connected Campus. A key stimulus to the process was the use of the Executive Leadership Program (ELP) at UCO to bring together representatives from several divisions to inform an institutional commitment to the Connected Campus. We review the elements of the developmental process from the perspectives of several contributors in that process that include the Office of Academic Affairs, CeCE, and ELP. These include cultural and organizational characteristics of the UCO campus and how obstacles were overcome to create the current learning ecosystem at UCO that deploys and hybridizes electronic and face-to-face approaches to teaching an array of learners. We believe this model, derived during turbulent economic times in our state, illustrates the potential for advancing learning environments that can create accessibility and relevance for programs marketed within a major metropolitan area.

Speakers
avatar for John Barthell

John Barthell

Provost & VP of Academic Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma
John F. Barthell is the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of Central Oklahoma. He is currently serving as the Chair of the Greater Oklahoma City Hispanic Chamber Board.
LB

Linda Banks

AVP - CeCE, University of Central Oklahoma
avatar for Charlotte Simmons

Charlotte Simmons

Associate VP for Academic Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma
Dr. Charlotte Simmons is the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Collaboration and Engagement Between Higher Ed, STEM Industries, and Community Schools to Improve STEM Interest in Middle School Students
Engaging students to increase their interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) is crucial to maintaining the STEM pipeline. In particular, studies have shown that students begin to lose interest in STEM in middle school and that students in low-income, socioeconomically disadvantaged schools are disproportionately affected. As part of the Erie Public Schools and United Way of Erie County Community School Initiative, Gannon University piloted an afterschool STEM program Feeding Minds and Families at Strong Vincent Middle School. In this six-week program, students were mentored by Gannon University STEM faculty and local STEM professionals in topics ranging from DNA technology to computational thinking. The program used family meals as an opportunity for engagement across all stakeholders. This presentation describes the collaboration, program development, and outcomes for improving STEM interest through activities that engage students and their families.

Speakers
QA

Quyen Aoh

Associate Professor, Gannon University


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Innovative Multi-Institution Approaches to K-12 Engagement
We will take a multi-perspective approach to discussing why and how to develop multi-institution K-12 engagement initiatives. We will look at two innovative programs, one which provides a framework for multiple universities to provide direct engagement with public school students and one which is a STEM exposure program for public school students in multiple cities. We will also look at how the case for such initiatives can be made to both internal audiences (for buy-in for resources and prioritization) and external audiences (to encourage collaboration and prove impact). Practitioners will speak to how such initiatives were first conceived, what purposes they are driving towards, and how they measure success. An economist will frame this work within a broader lens of the value proposition of universities in communities. Panel members will include Lee Huang, Senior Vice President and Principal at Econsult Solutions, Inc.; Hillary Aisenstein Kane, Director of the Philadelphia Higher Education Network for Neighborhood Development (PHENND); Eli Kennedy, CEO of the Summer Math and Science Honors Academy (SMASH); JeNell LaRue, Assistant Director of GEAR UP at the School District of Philadelphia; and Brittany Lewis, GEAR UP Coordinator for Temple University.

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Kane

Hillary Kane

Director, PHENND


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Mobile App Prototyping and Other Technology Tools for Community Engagement
Over the last several years we have utilized a networked anthropology approach with several technology tools as a form of community engagement through partners such as the National Park Service and various community groups and non-profits in the Baltimore region. Out of several media methods, the creation of mobile app prototypes has proven to be a highly successful tool to create critical conversations between disparate community members and institutional partners such as universities and non-profits. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how to utilize both analog and digital tools for mobile app prototyping as a community engagement strategy for faculty and other practitioners using projects created in Baltimore between Towson University faculty and our collaborators. We highly recommend attendance by conference attendees who are present with their community partners to take an actionable tool into their work together.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Durington

Matt Durington

Director of Community Engagement and Partnerships, College of Liberal Arts - Towson University
I am a professor of anthropology at Towson University and serve as director for community engagement and partnerships in the Division of Strategic Partnerships and Applied Research. In this role I assist faculty, staff and students in community engagement efforts in Baltimore and... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Lightning Session: Two Drexel University Community Engagement Programs Team Up to Support Early Childhood Education and Workforce Development
Two Drexel Office of University and Community Partnerships Programs – Workforce and Economic Inclusion and Action for Early Learning (AFEL) – have created a tailored program that supports workforce development and quality ECE aligned with a citywide priority to increase access to high-quality Pre-K for all children. AFEL is a Drexel-led collaboration of education, social service and community-based organizations working to improve the quality of ECE in the West Philadelphia Promise Zone, a federally designated high-need, high poverty area. Key to AFEL’s success is a place-based strategy that supports 25 West Philadelphia childcare providers’ ECE quality improvement in the statewide quality rating system. The City of Philadelphia’s recent priority around universal Pre-K has led to an increase in demand for qualified ECE instructors. Drexel’s Workforce and Economic Inclusion has adapted its Medical Assistant Pipeline Program to address this need by recruiting, pre-screening, providing foundational skills training and supporting participants through the AFEL Child Development Associate (CDA) Program. This a free program for unemployed, under-employed and currently employed childcare workers or residents of West Philadelphia in need of the credential to maintain or improve their employment and support the childcare provider’s continuous quality improvement. This strategy aligns with Drexel President John Fry’s strong commitment to civic engagement. In the past two years, 30 participants have earned CDA certification, supporting their program’s need for credentialed workers, improving quality ratings and positively impacting the lives of more than 1,100 West Philadelphia children.

Speakers
avatar for Soneyet Muhammad

Soneyet Muhammad

Director, Workforce and Economic Inclusion, Drexel University
MW

Maria Walker

Project Director, Drexel University Action for Early Learning
For more than 15 years, Maria Walker has worked in a variety of capacities to improve the lives of Philadelphians. Currently Project Director for Drexel University’s Office of University and Community Partnerships, Walker has coordinated several programs to improve educational outcomes... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Commonwealth A1 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Vote for Your Future: Students Reverse 40-year Decline in Voter Engagement and Advance the Institution's Role in Student Democratic Development
Philadelphia Higher Education Network for Neighborhood Development (PHENND)'s mini-workshop will explore the role of higher eds in student democratic development and provide participants with lessons learned from some of Philadelphia's successful student voter engagement efforts.

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) will present key challenges, successes and promising next steps with non-partisan programs that are student-run and institutionally supported. PHENND, whose membership includes over 30 higher eds in Philadelphia and the surrounding area, will share how it is creating opportunities for learning and collaboration across campuses.

While higher eds have both an opportunity and a responsibility to support students’ democratic development and civic engagement, including but not limited to voting, both the explicit and the implicit curriculum can directly inhibit them.

Student leadership in student voter engagement through service learning classes, research projects, internships and volunteer roles is mutually transformational. It positively impacts both student learning and institutional transformation -- while positively and measurably impacting voter and civic engagement.

Penn and CCP have identified key issues regarding governance, management, structure, and resources needed for implementing campus-wide and non-partisan voter engagement efforts. In addition, these programs are identifying important policy change opportunities at the higher ed and the local government levels.

Attendees will be provided with campus-wide voter engagement plans created by Penn and CCP. This will include samples of student research and service-learning courses that are helping to develop, implement and evaluate the programs, as well as examples of student engagement materials and messages.

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Kane

Hillary Kane

Director, PHENND
avatar for Michelle Lopez

Michelle Lopez

Manager, Community Engagement and Civic Leadership, Community College of Philadelphia
Higher education and non-profit professional with over a decade of experience in volunteer management, event planning, community engagement, relationship building, marketing and fundraising. Proud Latina serving the Philadelphia community, passionate about encouraging local students... Read More →
CB

Cory Bowman

Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania
Cory Bowman has been working for Penn Program for Public Service since 1991 and for Penn’s Netter Center for Community Partnerships since its inception in 1992.Cory helps coordinate the core functions of the Center, including developing academic partnerships with schools, non-profits... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Washington A 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:00am

Cradle to Retirement: PreK-12 Partnerships and the University Anchor Mission
In 2019, the Anchor Learning Network engaged in researching and writing case-studies for how early learning and Kindergarten through high school partnerships create more opportunities for higher education institutions to better serve local students and improve college access. Partnerships focus on workforce and career development programs that strengthen the education to career pipeline. Acting on the intention of the anchor mission, institutions of higher learning will share best practices for assisting the transition of youth from local communities into long-term, high quality, civic leading employment positions. Discussion topics will explore the interconnections and innovation levers that can be developed to strengthen the anchor mission’s impact on local communities, including how the people closest to the problems are better supported in engineering the mutual and long-term solutions.

Speakers
JF

Joanne Ferroni

Director, University & Community Partnerships, Drexel University
avatar for Arlette Cepeda

Arlette Cepeda

Director of CLCE, Wagner College
Arlette Cepeda is a civic professional and a visual artist. Cepeda is the director of the Center for Leadership and Community Engagement (CLCE) at Wagner College. She oversees student programs and initiatives focused on community engagement such as the Bonner Leaders Program, the... Read More →
avatar for Mary Jane Eisenhauer

Mary Jane Eisenhauer

Associate Director, School of Education, Purdue Northwest
avatar for Lisa Webb

Lisa Webb

Assistant Vice President, Strategic Initiatives and Health Sciences Education/VCU
Dr. Lisa Webb has over 15 years of professional experience in the development, implementation, and evaluation of student programs and academic support services in high school and graduate health sciences education, as well as management of health career pipeline programs. Dr. Webb... Read More →


Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:00am - 12:00pm
Washington C 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:30am

Community-Based Workforce Development Planning and Pipeline Programs: A Win-Win for Employers, Schools and the Community
VCU Health has a long history of fully integrating workforce/pipeline programs into its anchor institution mission. A range of programs prepares community members for health care careers. The first program implemented in 2005, “From Jumpropes to Stethoscopes” supports middle schoolers with health education, summer camps, shadowing experiences and mentoring. Launched in 2009, “Project Search” is a collaboration with Richmond Public Schools, the state Department of Rehabilitation Services and VCU to allow high school seniors with disabilities to spend their senior year at the hospital; students participate in internships to prepare them for work and life.

Based on needs identified by employers, public schools and the community two programs were added last year. “Quick Start to Construction” addresses the need for skilled construction employees for planned projects. Partnering with local law enforcement and a community agency, non-violent offenders participate in a five-week job-readiness program, and receive on the job training. “RVA Pathways to Health Careers” brings a diverse range of community partners together to prepare at risk youth for employment in the health system. Career pathway development continues after employment. Both programs provide skills/education assessments and classes on resume writing, interviewing, team work, appropriate attire, computer and customer service skills, personal budgeting and job search techniques.

Each program has resulted in employment, and robust health and education benefits for employees. The intentional alignment of health system and community workforce goals has resulted in creating viable and meaningful career pathways for our community.

Speakers
PB

Porsha Bennett

Manager of Patient Transportation, VCU Health System
HH

Harrison Hayes

Director, Pathways to Health Care Workforce, Virginia Commonwealth University



Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
Tubman 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

11:30am

Institution-Supported Agriculture (Buckeye ISA): Addressing Neighborhood Food Security at the Family Level
The Buckeye ISA project started with ambitious goals to address identified significant neighborhood challenges faced not only in Columbus, but also in many other communities. The project is supporting formation of a network of more than 100 low-income households, particularly in communities of color, that grow and sell food to Ohio State. The ultimate goal is to increase household food security and self-reliance for fresh food, while creating new economic opportunities through Ohio State's buying power. Ohio ranks among the worst states in the nation for food security, but Ohio State is making a major investment in a systems approach to tackling this challenge. The university set a goal of increasing locally and sustainably sourced food to 40 percent of the up to $39 million in annual food purchasing by 2025. This new focus on local sourcing creates economic pull to producers in surrounding communities, many of which are well above the national average household food insecurity rates. The network would be composed of many farmers or gardeners and one very large buyer, Ohio State, institution-supported agriculture, or the Buckeye ISA.

Speakers
avatar for Timothy McDermott

Timothy McDermott

Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension
I joined Ohio State University Extension four years ago after twenty years in private practice veterinary medicine and surgery. I currently am an Agriculture and Natural Resources educator in Franklin County, home of Columbus, Ohio, the nation's 14th largest city, where I do local... Read More →



Wednesday October 23, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
Adams 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:00pm

Lunch Buffet
Lunch in Millennium Foyer and Millennium Hall

Wednesday October 23, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Social Events 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

12:30pm

Plenary: Temple Talks Recidivism: Creating Opportunities for Returning Citizens on a University Campus
This plenary will highlight how Temple University has created programming and collaborations designed to help returning citizens reenter society and succeed personally and professionally.

Lori Pompa will highlight the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, an educational program that effectively facilitates dialogue and interaction between college students, incarcerated students, and advocates for criminal justice reform. Pompa will share how the partnership between higher education and correction systems create opportunities to learn and foster civic engagement. Through community building across social difference, Inside-Out has provided coursework for more than 35,000 campus-based college students and incarcerated students worldwide.

Pompa will be joined by William Hart, administrator in the Temple University Office of Community Relations. Hart will share his testimony as an ex-offender who, upon release from prison, committed to serving others through social justice. Hart graduated from Temple University and was later offered employment by the institution. He left Temple to manage the Office of Reintegration Services for the City of Philadelphia. After serving in this role for several years, Hart returned to Temple where he serves as the Associate Director of Community Relations. He will discuss his personal experiences as an ex-offender navigating through society and receiving support for education and employment opportunities.

Speakers
LP

Lori Pompa

Instructor/Teacher, Temple University/Criminal Justice
WB

William (Bill) Hart

Associate Director, Temple University/Community Relations


Wednesday October 23, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Millennium Hall 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA